Aug 4 2017

Back-To-School Tips

When August comes around, we start thinking about school. Either the back-to-school sale, school supplies list, making sure everything’s ready, or just dreading the upcoming semester. What we might not always think about is how our furry friends in the home might understand what August means. I’m going through some tips and explaining what our pets feel like during those different schedules after summer.

Not all animals will feel this way when people start going back to work and school, but some will experience sadness and loneliness. They might mope around or sleep more. Maybe your dog starts chewing on things they shouldn’t, or maybe your cat becomes more vocal or pees in the litter box. Many people will not connect this to back-to-school time. Like some people, animals like having routine because it makes them feel secure. During the summer, if kids are playing with them all day, and suddenly they go away for long hours, it can cause confusion and stress.

There are so many ways that we can prepare for to curb this anxiety your pet might feel, and it is a great teaching moment for your children! Here are some tips that can get you through this transition.

1. Transition Time

If you prepare at least one week before school starts, the animal can mentally prepare for your absence. This could be leaving your dog inside during the early hours of the morning by themselves. Only for about thirty minutes or so, and that should help simulate school time. Another good trick is to start breaking out lunch boxes or school supplies that your dog would see when you leave them. They can get used to the items and desensitize them around it, making for an easier transition. 

2. Come up with a routine.

As mentioned above, animals are all about routine, and without it they can have severe depression or separation anxiety. To avoid that, you can start a new routine for all year round, that can benefit the children, you, and your animals. The schedule should include but is not limited to feeding, bathroom breaks, walks, and exercise/play time at set times each day. You could plan for a morning walk before or after school, and cuddle time in the evening, depending on what your schedule looks like. Coming up with a routine will reduce the stress on your animal.

3. Turn on the TV/music before you leave.

I do this with my animals, because I think they worry more when it is completely quiet. We used to turn on the radio, but now we turn on the TV for them. I usually put it on cartoons because they make the most noise and they can hear happy music. Human voices or calm music helps them adjust from seeing and hearing you all day to just nighttime.

4. Prepare special toys for the environment.

With you and the kids gone, the animals have lost their favorite playmate. If you provide toys throughout the day, and switch them out to make it fun, they will be able to transition. You can also provide food puzzles so they have to play and think while eating their food. We personally hide treats around our living room so they can have that to do as well. Some people will fill a puzzle feeder or Kong toy with peanut butter or cream cheese for an extra treat. Save those “favorite” toys for when the kids come home so they can enjoy it a little more.

5. Think about Daycare.

Sometimes dropping your dog off to daycare will help them make new friends and be busy all day. Cat daycares are few and far in-between, but you can always check to see if someone does that, but cats will not be as upset as dogs will. This will allow your dog to expend some energy, while being in good care and the company of others.

6. Quality Time

It is important to re-connect with your pet at the end of a busy week. With school back in session, your dog may not get as much time playing with your family as during the care-free days of summer. Remember that even though your pet wasn’t at work or school all day, he still needs time to unwind. Consider activities like: Long walks at the park, Lounging around on the couch, Daily walks, even as the days get shorter, A weekend picnic, A weekend hike, A visit to a restaurant or establishment that allows dogs, and A special weeknight brushing.

There aren’t that many tips for keeping your pet calm and collected while going back-to-school, but this is really all it takes. August can be a stressful time for you and your family, but don’t forget about your furry friends!

Come visit Wayside Waifs!

  • Monday: CLOSED
  • Tuesday: CLOSED
  • Wednesday: Noon-8pm
  • Thursday: Noon-8pm
  • Friday: Noon-8pm
  • Saturday: 10am-6pm
  • Sunday: 1pm-6pm

Written by Teryn


Jun 23 2017

Fourth of July Safety Tips

It’s the time of year to celebrate Independence Day! It is an annual Federal holiday commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence and registering as a country, the United States of America. We typically celebrate with family, friends, fireworks, and good times. However, our furry friends don’t enjoy the holiday as much as we do, so we here at Wayside thought it would be helpful to provide tips on Fourth of July safety for our four-legged family members.

1. Have updated ID and photos of all your pets.

This goes without saying, but sometimes the animals get so nervous and scared they might try to run off and find a safe place. Having proper identification and updated photos greatly increases their chances of coming home sooner. At our store Whiskers & Wags, we sell a variety of collars and ID tags that you can purchase on campus.

2. Leave your pets at home.

To avoid something like a lost pet happening, and to ease your furry friends’ stress, consider leaving them at home for the celebration. Most pets do not want to be near fireworks when they are set off, and find the most comfort at home. Please do not lock them in the car either, because they could suffer from heat stroke and/or brain damage.

3. Don’t put insect repellant on your pet.

This also should go without saying, but if your family is having a get-together and you would like to take your pets before the fireworks show, do not put insect repellant or sunscreen on your pet. There are certain ingredients in both that are poisonous for animals, and will have effects like neurological disorders and lethargy.

4. Never leave alcoholic beverages unattended to where your pets could reach them.

Dogs and cats are naturally curious, and if a beer or cocktail is left on the ground, they might consider knocking it over and drinking it. If consumed, the animal can get intoxicated and very weak, and could even go into a coma. Put those drinks on coasters on a high-rise table so they are unable to reach it, and provide fresh water for them to drink instead.

5. Keep your pet on their normal diet.

This is the time of year when people are barbecuing more and more because the weather is nice. And keep in mind that foods such as onions, chocolate, coffee, avocado, grapes, raisins, salt and yeast dough can all be potentially toxic to companion animals. Any change, even for one meal, can give your pet severe indigestion and diarrhea.

6. Don’t give your pet access to glow jewelry. 

Glow jewelry is that super popular item that people put in freezers and wraps around your joints in place of bracelets and necklaces. While the luminescent substance contained in these products is not highly toxic, excessive drooling and gastrointestinal irritation could still result from ingestions, and intestinal blockage could occur from swallowing large pieces of the plastic containers.

7. Don’t force your pet into a costume for the holiday. 

It may seem cute to dress them up in the red, white, and blue, but unless your dog (or even less likely, your cat) loves to play dress-up, don’t push the issue. If they have a medical condition, some sort of loose clothing is definitely acceptable. Also, if your animal shuts down during the fireworks, consider purchasing a thunder shirt, which can be found at our store Whiskers & Wags. They are proven to help make animals feel safe and secure, while keeping anxiety levels down.

8. Do keep matches and lighter fluid out of the animals’ reach.

Certain types of matches contain chlorates, which could potentially damage blood cells and result in difficulty breathing—or even kidney disease in severe cases. Lighter fluid can be irritating to skin, and if ingested can produce gastrointestinal irritation and central nervous system depression. Keep those items on a high-rise table out of their reach, and all will be well!

9. Consider getting calming treats and Adaptil collars

Calming treats and Adaptil/anti-anxiety collars are both sold in our retail store Whiskers & Wags, and they have been helpful to ease stress for our animals here. The collar mimics the dogs’ natural pheromone that helps ease tension, and can help them relax during a fireworks display, as long as they are indoors. Calming treats will help do the same things, and will taste good as well!

10. Brush up on flea/tick treatment.

Ticks and fleas are more abundant than ever because of the mild winter we had. They will find a host environment in dogs and cats, and during a celebration it might go unnoticed. We also sell seresto collars which help battle unwanted visitors for up to eight months. They will help during that barbecue and high heated areas! They can be found at our retail store Whiskers & Wags.

These are just some tips that help our furry friends, and you, prepare for the celebratory holiday! Enjoy, and be safe! Our retail store Whiskers & Wags is open during our adoption hours, provided below.

Adoption Hours:

Monday: CLOSED
Tuesday: CLOSED
Wednesday: Noon-8pm
Thursday: Noon-8pm
Friday: Noon-8pm
Saturday: 10am-6pm
Sunday: 1pm-6pm

Written by Teryn


Dec 6 2016

Frosty Paws – Keep Your Pet Safe This Winter

sadie_snow-nose

Winter is definitely upon us! Not only is it time for humans to dig out their cold weather clothes, it’s also time to think about keeping our pets safe during these arctic cold days. Here are some tips to keeping your pets safe.

1. Keep your pets inside. Limit your pets outside time for bathroom breaks when temperatures start to tumble. If it’s too cold for you, it’s defintely too cold for your pet. If your pet is normally outside, move them to a sheltered garage or heated dog house, away from the wind.

2. Outdoor cats have been known to find refuge underneath the hoods of cars. When the car is started, the cat could become injured or even killed by moving parts of the engine. If you have an outdoor cat, honk the horn before starting the car to give the cat a chance to escape.

3. Keep your dog on a leash in the winter weather. Pets can lose their scent in the snow and ice and find refuge in unfamiliar places. This is also a good opportunity to check your dog or cats id tag to make sure they have the most current contact information in case your pet becomes lost or stolen. We also recommend mircrochipping your pet. More dogs are lost during the winter than any other time of the year.

4. When getting your pet groomed, don’t have them shaved down to the skin. A longer coat provides more warmth. Bathing your dog? Be sure to completely dry them before taking them out for a walk. For short-haired breeds, put them in a warm sweater with a high collar that gives the pet coverage from the base of their tail to the belly. My toy poodle Lucy loves to wear her jacket and waits for me to put it on her before going outside.

5. Make sure to keep a dry towel near the door when you bring in your dogs from being outside. Thoroughly dry their paws, legs and belly. They can pick up bits of salt, antifreeze and other lethal chemicals from being outside. It can also be painful for the animal to have shards of ice in their fur. A dogs paws can actually bleed from encrusted ice. This is also a good opportunity to give them some extra love and praise them for good outdoor behavior.

6. Never leave your pet alone in a vehicle. The vehicle can act as a refrigerator, keeping the cold inside and causing your pet to freeze to death.

7. If your pet spends a lot of time playing outside, increase his food supply. Make sure to include extra protein to help keep his fur in great shape.

8. Coolant and antifreeze are lethal for cats and dogs. If you have any spills in your garage or driveway make sure to clean them thoroughly. Stay away from product s that use ethylene glycol. If your pet should ingest any of these products, call your veterinarian immediately.

9. Rock salt is also dangerous for pets. “Safe Paw” is pet safe ice melt is available for sale at Wayside Waifs and is safe for pets.

10. Give your pet a warm place to sleep. Make sure beds are located away from doors and drafts. Warm blankets or a large pillow is great.

 

Written by: Trish Stinger, Digital Marketing/Brand Manager
Wayside Waifs


Feb 3 2014

Quick Tips for Wintertime Potty Training

potty trainingPotty training your pup can be trying business. So, what do you do when you add snow or ice-laden ground to the picture? Although a wintery mix can complicate things, taking some basic measures can help ease this transition. At Wayside Waifs, we know a thing or two about potty training, and we are here to share some quick and simple tricks that should have your pooch potty trained before you can say “spring” and by the time the flowers are in full bloom.

Potty Training Pointers:

Create a Potty Zone.

When there is snow on the ground and you are trying to potty train your canine, be sure to clear off an area that facilitates your dog’s needs. The area does not have to be huge, but you will want to be certain it is large enough that your dog does not feel cramped.

Send Cues.

One of the most important parts of potty training is sending your pooch the right cues. You want potty time to be unlike any other time. So, when you grab your leash or head to the yard, be sure to get down to business. Saying commands like “Go potty,” or “Do your business,” just before tinkle time is a good start. A rule of thumb? Be firm and consistent with your commands, so your dog associates them with potty time.

Praise, Praise, Praise.

Once your pooch gets it right, going potty outside upon command, make sure to let them know they have done a great job. That’s right; after they finish their business, remind them how good their behavior is. Treats are another form of positive reinforcement; however, just remember to dish them out immediately after the proper behavior occurs.

Learn More

Looking for a canine companion? Wayside Waifs has a number of pooches that would love to find a permanent home. These pointers should get any pooch on the road to becoming house trained in a short matter of time.


Shelter Hours
:

Wednesday-Friday Noon-8pm

Saturday 10am-6pm

Sunday 1pm-6pm 

 


Dec 19 2013

Grrr-eat Holiday Gifts for Your Canine Companion

holiday giftsYou made your holiday gift list, but have you checked it twice? Before you complete your holiday shopping, be sure to include something special for the four-legged friend on your gift list. Your furball has behaved all year, so be sure to reward him or her. At Wayside Waifs, we shopped around and have some grrr-eat holiday gift ideas for your canine friend.

Holiday Gifts for Your Best Friend:

Christmas PJs

As you gather around the Christmas tree and wait for Santa, be sure your pup has something snuggly to keep warm. No matter how your family is celebrating the holiday season, there are holiday PJs for everyone. Flannel, cotton, and fleece are all great materials that are sure to keep your dog warm. Hop online, or if you are up for a challenge, try making your pooch some homemade PJs. The great news? It’s in your dog’s DNA to unconditionally love whatever your create, so don’t let that stop you!

Stocking

If you are looking for a simple way to dress up your mantel over the holiday season, look no further than a dog stocking. A cute holiday stocking for your furry friend can complement your decor AND act as the perfect means for spoiling your family dog. When it comes to dog stocking stuffers, the options are plentiful. Squeaky toys make great gifts, and for just $5, you can purchase several toys from Whiskers and Wags, our in-store boutique that supports dogs in our care. Bones, chew toys, and dog accessories are other great stocking stuffers. As a rule of thumb, be sure to keep your dog’s stocking out of reach. We wouldn’t want your pooch to do anything to get on Santa’s naughty list.

Professional Grooming

Whether your pooch has a mane of high-maintenance tresses or could just use a fresh bath, a date at the groomers is a real treat. A day at the salon doesn’t have to be all nail polish and primping. A nice brushing, bath, or something more are all great ways to show the love to your canine, getting your pooch off to a great start for the New Year.

Give the Gift of Volunteering

Have a pooch of your own but want to really get in the holiday spirit? There are a number of dogs at Wayside Waifs who could benefit from your volunteer work. This holiday season, something as simple as your time could brighten the life of one of our on-site animals. At Wayside Waifs, there is something for everyone. Cat and dog socialization and fostering are both ways you can make a difference in the life of our animals.

To learn how you can get involved this holiday season, call (816) 761-8151 or contact us today.


Oct 22 2013

Meet Helen

Helen is looking for her forever home!

Helen is looking for her forever home!

Hi there, I’m Helen! I’m a happy and friendly dog, and I’m so ready to finally settle down with my new family in my new home. My past year has been an overwhelming whirlwind of change and instability, so I’m excited to get into a routine and just start living a safe and normal life. That’s out there for me, right? I think I deserve it, so I sure hope Wayside is the place where I’ll finally find my new family and new life.

I am a 3 year old, 46 pound Pit Bull Terrier mix. I seem to be at least partially housetrained, because I know to go the bathroom as soon as I get outside, but please be patient with me when we first get home, as I learn my new routine with you. I promise I’ll do my best! I’m sure you’ve already noticed how beautiful I am! Well, I don’t mean to brag, but I assure you, you’ve never seen a coat of fur like mine. I have gorgeous light brown eyes and unique markings that make me a one of a kind type of dog. I had puppies at some point. I don’t really remember that time of my life much, but I hope they’re all happy and healthy and living wonderful lives now! I actually moved here to Kansas City from the Dallas, TX area, where I was in a high kill shelter. I was rescued by a group of people from Petsmart Charities, who move dogs to different shelters, in order to help them find new homes more easily. So I ended up here at Wayside. So far, so good. Now I just need you and then I’ll be set.

I’m curious, friendly, and energetic. I love to explore and follow my hound nose during walks. I do pretty well on my leash too. And I am the best cuddle partner ever! I’m a 46 pound lap dog, if you give me the chance! I like to put my front paws and face right in your lap and listen to you talk to me sweetly and tell me what a good girl I am. I was adopted to a nice woman for awhile, but things didn’t work out for me there. Oh, she loved me very much and had lots of great stuff to say about me. But she had a 1 year old nephew who spent lots of time with us and he didn’t know how to give me my space, so I snapped at him, to tell him to back off. He didn’t understand, of course, since he was still a baby, but it was the only way I knew how to communicate with him, so things just didn’t work out. I’d love a home without kids under the age of 12 please. And if I do live with older kids, I hope they can be respectful of me. Please bring the whole family to meet me before we all go home together, to make sure we’re a good fit for one another.

I’d also like a home as your only animal, please. I like to chase cats and other small, furry animals. And I’m rude and pushy with other dogs, never really sure when to back down, so I just don’t want to deal with them. I’ll be happiest as an only animal, but I promise to give you so much doggie love that you won’t miss not having another animal in your home. I hope you don’t mind…I’m just looking for a specific home, so that I don’t end up back at the shelter, that’s all.
Please come for me soon! I need a safe and stable place to finally call home. Having pups and moving across the country and being homeless is stressful and upsetting to a dog like me. I just want people around who I can be close to and show affection to every single day.

I’d love a daily walk and a soft spot to rest my head. The love of my very own family is an incredible dream that I’ve had for so long and I feel it’s about to come true now. I hope so!

Love, Helen

 

PS watch my video on Wayside’s website.


Jul 11 2013

Adoptathon – Find your purr-fect match

 Adopt-a-thon

106.5 The Wolf and Wayside Waifs are proud to present the 2013 Summer Adoptathon on July 12-14. The event will feature live broadcasts all day Friday featuring some of Kansas City’s most listened to DJs – Roger Carson, Codie Allen, Wes Poe, and Shotgun Jaxson. This weekend only, all pet adoptions are just $25. Plus, fees will be waived on all additional pets adopted. All adoptable animals are spay/neutered, microchipped and current on vaccinations. It’s the “purr”fect time to find your furry friend.

TheWolfWayside Waifs will be open special hours for this weekend’s adoptathon:

  • Friday, July 12: 6 a.m.-8 p.m.
  • Saturday, July 13: 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
  • Sunday, July 14: 12 p.m.-6 p.m.

Check out some of the grrreat dogs, cats, puppies, kittens and bunnies looking forward to meeting you.

The Adoptathon is just one of Wayside Waifs’ anchor adoption events this summer to help the shelter compete in the 2013 ASPCA/Rachael Ray $100K Adoption Challenge. Our goal is to help 1,831 animals in our community find loving forever homes by the end of August.

 The adoption fun begins this Friday at 6am! We hope to see a lot of The Wolf Pack fans participating.


Dec 20 2012

Let It Snow! Keeping Your Pets Safe This Winter

Winter is definitely upon us! Not only is it time for humans to dig out their cold weather clothes, it’s also time to think about keeping our pets safe during these arctic cold days. Here are some tips to keeping your pets safe.

1. Keep your pets inside. Limit your pets outside time for bathroom breaks when temperatures start to tumble. If its too cold for you, it’s defintely too cold for your pet. If your pet is normally outside, move them to a sheltered garage or heated dog house, away from the wind.

2. Outdoor cats have been known to find refuge underneath the hoods of cars. When the car is started, the cat could become injured or even killed by moving parts of the engine. If you have an outdoor cat, honk the horn before starting the car to give the cat a chance to escape.

3. Keep your dog on a leash in the winter weather. Pets can lose their scent in the snow and ice and find refuge in unfamiliar places. This is also a good opportunity to check your dog or cats id tag to make sure they have the most current contact information in case your pet becomes lost or stolen. We also recommend mircrochipping your pet. More dogs are lost during the winter than any other time of the year.

4. When getting your pet groomed, don’t have them shaved down to the skin. A longer coat provides more warmth. Bathing your dog? Be sure to completely dry them before taking them out for a walk. For short-haired breeds, put them in a warm sweater with a high collar that gives the pet coverage from the base of their tail to the belly. My toy poodle Lucy loves to wear her jacket and waits for me to put it on her before going outside.

5. Make sure to keep a dry towel near the door when you bring in your dogs from being outside. Thoroughly dry their paws, legs and belly. They can pick up bits of salt, antifreeze and other lethal chemicals from being outside. It can also be painful for the animal to have shards of ice in their fur. A dogs paws can actually bleed from encrusted ice. This is also a good opportunity to give them some extra love and praise them for good outdoor behavior.

6. Never leave your pet alone in a vehicle. The vehicle can act as a refridgerator, keeping the cold inside and causing your pet to freeze to death.

7. If your pet spends a lot of time playing outside, increase his food supply. Make sure to include extra protein to help keep his fur in great shape.

8. Coolant and antifreeze are lethal for cats and dogs. If you have any spills in your garage or driveway make sure to clean them thoroughly. Stay away from product s that use ethylene glycol. If your pet should ingest any of these products, call your veterinarian immediately.

9. Rock salt is also dangerous for pets. “Safe Paw” is pet safe ice melt is available for sale at Wayside Waifs and is safe for pets.

10. Give your pet a warm place to sleep. Make sure beds are located away from doors and drafts. Warm blankets or a large pillow is great.

Written by Trish Stinger
Web & Marketing Manager at Wayside Waifs


Dec 21 2010

The Challenges of Raising a Puppy

My sweet boy Truman

An adorable puppy for Christmas – I can’t think of anything cuter.  But before you take home that darling little creature, there are some important things to consider. 

I write from experience.  After I got my first puppy nearly 10 years ago, I wondered if I had actually adopted a little monster cleverly disguised as a precious puppy.  I had no idea how much work raising a puppy entailed.  Truman had lots of accidents, chewed up countless pairs of my favorite shoes (and almost anything else left on the floor) and generated numerous complaints about his incessant barking from my neighbors.  I remember walking Truman around my apartment complex at three o’clock in the morning in the freezing cold, wondering what in the world I had gotten myself into!  

Make no mistake, I wouldn’t trade that experience for the world.  Truman taught me all about patience and responsibility.  And anyone who’s thinking about getting a puppy needs to have lots of both.  Just ask Alyssa Willet, the Adoptions Supervisor at Wayside Waifs. 

“When people adopt puppies, I ask them if they are ready to have a toddler in their home, because that’s what they are getting,” Willett said.  “Puppies don’t know right from wrong, they depend on you to teach them everything.  If you don’t have patience, don’t get a puppy.” 

You will also need lots of time for your puppy.  They develop most of their behavior traits during their first year of life, and you’ll need to be there every step of the way to help them grow into well-behaved, well-socialized members of society.  One of the best ways to learn the basics is by enrolling in an obedience class. 

“Even the most experienced dog owners can learn something at obedience class,” said Willett.  “And the puppies not only learn great skills, they also benefit from socializing with the other puppies in class.” 

Willett is a big proponent of crate training, because it can make housetraining a breeze.  She recommends keeping the crate in a high-traffic area of your home, possibly even your family room so the puppy can always see you and know it hasn’t been abandoned.  Willett also encourages you to keep a watchful eye on your puppy at all times, and don’t let them immediately have the run of your house.  It’s surprising just how quickly they can get into mischief. 

Even before you pick out that perfect puppy, you need to do some basic research.  A quick Google search will turn up loads valuable information about every breed of dog.  Knowing the personality traits, temperament and basic needs of your dog’s primary breed can help you determine if the dog is a good fit for your family.  

I also encourage anyone who wants a puppy to check their local shelters first.  You’ll be surprised at the wide varieties and breeds of puppies available for adoption.  If you don’t find your ideal puppy at a shelter, do your homework and find a responsible breeder who can guarantee your puppy and his parents were raised in a loving, humane environment. 

One other important thing to consider is the expense of a puppy.  One of the advantages to adopting a puppy from Wayside Waifs or your local shelter is your puppy is already spay/neutered and has already received its age appropriate vaccinations.  Still, the puppy will need booster shots every few weeks until they are five months old, so potential puppy parents need to keep vet bills in mind.  As your dog grows, you can also expect to spend more money on its food, a bigger crate and heartworm, flea & tick preventatives.  Obedience training is an additional expense.  At Wayside Waifs our professional dog trainers charge $100 for a series of six classes.     

Just remember the love of an animal is priceless, and even though raising a puppy is a challenge, it’s also highly rewarding.  Cherish all those puppy kisses, that sweet puppy breath and their hilarious antics.  Most of all enjoy building that special bond with your puppy as it grows. 

“It’s so fun to see who they become,” said Willett. 

Truman became the love of my life.  Yes, getting him through that puppy stage was a challenge, but it was worth all those ruined shoes, carpet cleaner and apologies to my neighbors.  Next month we’ll celebrate his tenth birthday and we’ll pray for many more wonderful years together.

Written by Ashlee Parker
Communications Relations Manager at Wayside Waifs


Nov 3 2010

Show You Care


The passage of Proposition B is a victory for thousands of animals suffering in deplorable puppy mills across Missouri.  The efforts to clean up and improve conditions in Missouri puppy mills are just beginning.  Wayside Waifs will open its doors to hundreds of animals rescued from these puppy mills in the coming months.  As you can see in this video, these animals desperately need us and we will not let them down.  We are asking for your financial support to help rehabilitate and provide life saving medical care to these animals.  Show you care and donate now.


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