Sep 10 2017

Pet Memorial Day

September 10th marks National Pet Memorial Day, a day in which people honor their pets, both past and present. It is a national holiday, and people gather or contemplate how their animal or animals have changed their lives, and share their stories. In honor of the holiday, we decided to showcase our Pet Memorial Services, and what all they do.

This is Tiffanie, our Pet Memorial Associate. She is solely responsible for this department currently, but she is amazing. She helps clients with the process of finding that perfect resting place for their pets, and manages the upkeep of our cemetery. She kindly took me and our other intern on a tour of her Pet Memorial Services building, and key spots of our cemetery. We just want to give a little snippet of how beautiful and well-kept our facility is.

 

 

Our Facilities department of Livio, Harold, and James keep up our wonderful grounds, and they work together with Tiffanie to help provide a safe and peaceful process during times of sadness. Tiffanie provided me with some interesting facts about our cemetery that I think you will enjoy.

  • We have one monkey buried here named April, back in 1972.
  • We also have two Bearded Dragons, and a couple of “Fire Dogs” that are memorialized by fire hydrants. 
  • As early as 1946, over 12,000 animals have been placed here, whether they are owned animals, or communal. 
  • Fenby Webster was the lead contributor who helped to found Wayside Waifs. She helped found the cemetery in 1946.
  • We named different parts of our cemetery. Top of the World is our oldest part of the cemetery, having dates as far back as 1946. Cedar Shadows is where most of our cremations are. Peaceful Meadows(see arch above) is where our body burials are. We also have a section called Companion Fields, which is for our communal burials and cremations. 
  • We have a wonderful gazebo in the center of Peaceful Meadows, that is a great for a nice resting place for dog walkers, or if you are just gazing upon our beautiful grounds!

There you have it! Tiffanie and our Facilities crew do such a wonderful job, and are here whenever you need them. Consider donating to our Pet Memorial Services team so they can continue to do a wonderful job with upkeep, and providing comfort in time of need! Have a wonderful National Pet Memorial Day, and reflect back on past pets, and make great memories with new ones!

Written by Teryn J.


Sep 1 2017

Falling for Fall

In less than a month, it will be Fall! Everyone looks forward to cooler weather, pretty scenery, and themed drinks. Our animals can enjoy the season as well, but there are certain things to watch out for. The following are tips on how to prepare for the season, which this year, is September 22 2017-December 21 2017.

1. Watch out for ticks.

Even though ticks are prevalent in the summer, they still are very active in the fall. If you do spot a tick, it is important to be careful when removing it. Any contact with the tick’s blood can potentially transmit infection to your dog or even to you! Treat the area with rubbing alcohol and pluck the parasite with tweezers, and make sure you’ve gotten the entire tick-leaving no parts behind.

2. Beware of rat poison, antifreeze, and other chemicals.

Ingesting antifreeze is lethal. Unfortunately both cats and dogs have been known to lick this up if any spills are is out and within reach. Make sure to check your car for leaks and make sure all bottles are stored far away from your pets. Be careful when it comes to mouse traps and rodenticides like rat and mouse poison. Direct ingestion can be deadly. If your pet does ingest any chemical, seek emergency care immediately. 

3. Watch out for mushrooms.

In some regions of the country, fall is just as wet as spring. That means more mushrooms will pop up in your yard depending on where you are. While most mushrooms are perfectly safe, there’s a small percentage that are highly toxic to our furry friends (and to us!). If you think your pet has ingested a mushroom, contact your vet immediately.

4. Let them grow out their fur coat.

If you have a dog that you shave during the summer, let him or her start growing their coat back in the fall. Just like you need your Fall/Winter coat they’ll needs theirs too. You can continue to groom them, but only for a trim and not a full-on haircut. You wouldn’t want them to get super cold outside!

5. Get your holiday plans in order.

As the holidays approach, most of us will get busier and possibly have to travel. Take time out and plan ahead so you can make the holidays easier on your pets. If you have a pet that has special needs or is wary of new people, be sure to tell your guests about your pet before they come over. Make sure your pets can’t escape through the main entrance of your home. This is especially important if you plan on having several guests in and out of the house this holiday season. It may be worth investing in a baby gate or creating some kind of barrier between the door and your pet. Especially if you have pet that’s known for bolting. If you are leaving out of town and will be boarding your pets, call months in advance as most vets and boarding places get booked up.

6. Be careful with holiday treats and decorations.

Aside from known hazards such as chocolate, cooked bones, raw bread dough, many fruits and vegetables can also be life threatening to pets. Many shiney new decorations look like really fun toys to your pets. Make sure decorations are out of reach because many of them contain toxic metals and can become choking hazards.
7. Keep school supplies out of reach.
Fall is back-to-school time, and those of you with young children know that means stocking up on items like glue sticks, pencils and magic markers. Although these items are considered not lethal to pets, their stomach might develop a blockage if ingested. Be sure your children keep their school supplies out of your pet’s reach.
8. Watch out for wildlife.
Autumn is the season when snakes are preparing for hibernation, increasing the possibility of bites to those unlucky pets who find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time. Pet parents should know what kinds of venomous snakes may be lurking in their environment—and where those snakes are most likely to be found—so pets can be kept out of those areas.
These are just some of the many things you can watch out for during the fall season, but hopefully these helped you! You can always visit our campus during our adoption hours.
  • Monday: CLOSED
  • Tuesday: CLOSED
  • Wednesday: Noon-8pm
  • Thursday: Noon-8pm
  • Friday: Noon-8pm
  • Saturday: 10am-6pm
  • Sunday: 1pm-6pm

Written by Teryn

 


Aug 14 2017

10 Reasons to Strutt With Your Mutt!

 Event Home Register | Donate                                                                                                    Share on Facebook! Share on Instagram Tweet about the Strutt    

 

10 Reasons to Strutt! 
KC’s largest dog-friendly 3K/5K event
 
1. Form a team! Invite friends and family to join you on September 17. Start a new tradition!
2. Enter your dog into the Pet Costume Contest! Only $5 to enter. We will award 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place on stage!
3. Your registration fee ($35-$45) pays for an animal’s vaccinations.
4. You will get an updated 2017 Strutt event t-shirt! The shirt is blue and super soft.
5. All youth fundraising will be matched by a generous Wayside donor. Get creative in collecting for the waifs! Host a lemonade stand or ask a company to sponsor you.
6. Are you a runner? 5K participants will get a cool finisher’s medal!
7. Poppy’s Ice Cream truck will be giving free pup-cones at Strutt! Yum!
8. Be a Top Team! We’ve got awards for the Largest Team and Top Fundraising Team on Strutt day! Will you be a winner?
Top Team Award.jpg Largest Team Award.jpg
9. Over 50 pet-related vendors in our Flealess Event Market – you’ll get tons of freebies and information on what our pet community has to offer! Be a vendor.
10. Earn fun prizes for your fundraising efforts! Check out our Prize Program here.
 
About Strutt
Strutt With Your Mutt is Sunday, September 17, 2017 in the Brookside neighborhood. We need your help to raise funds for the homeless pets at Wayside Waifs!
There are many ways you can help. Register your team today, fundraise and be a voice for the Waifs, and ask your friends and family to support you!
Stay Social!
Be sure to stay up-to-date with all things Strutt With Your Mutt! Head over to our Facebook page and be sure to “like” us!
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Upcoming Wayside Events
 August 20
Prize Sponsors: 
Ameristar Cares
Bayer
Best in Show Sponsors:
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Aug 11 2017

FIV: Fabulous, Invincible, and Valuable

FIV(Feline Immunodeficiency Virus) is a complex retrovirus that causes immunodeficiency disease in domestic cats. In non-fancy jargon, basically the cat’s body is unable to properly protect the immune system. As a result of immunodeficiency, most infected cats do not show symptoms and have a normal life expectancy, but they are prone to developing other infections and certain types of cancer. We adopt out FIV positive cats, and I just want to showcase how great they are, by explaining their unique quality.

A retrovirus, such as FIV, is slow-moving and can lay dormant in the body for months and even years. That is why most infected cats do not show symptoms right away and live a normal life expectancy. Many people compare it to the human virus HIV(Human Immunodeficiency Virus.) Genetics may or may not play a role in if a cat is more susceptible in getting the virus. The average age is five years at the time of diagnosis, and the likelihood of infection increases with age.

FIV is mainly passed from cat to cat through deep bite wounds, the kind that usually occur outdoors during aggressive fights and territorial disputes-the perfect reason to keep your cat inside. Another less common way is if the mother of a litter is FIV positive. She may pass that down to one or more of her kittens, which is where genetics comes into play. FIV is more common in males because of the more aggressive tendencies males get in terms of defending themselves in the outdoor territory, but female cats can get it as well. Cats who live indoors are the least likely to be infected. The most common cat that will get FIV is an un-altered, free-roaming, outdoor male cat who fights.

People cannot catch FIV, only from cat to cat. As mentioned above, symptoms take years to develop, but some of those are fever, weight loss,  anemia, dental disease, and sneezing, to name a few. If you think your cat has FIV, you should schedule an appointment with your veterinarian to get them tested. FIV infection is determined through a blood test, and sometimes they require another test be done later on for confirmation.

At this moment, there is no cure for FIV, but it is very manageable. There is a vaccine, but it does not protect all cats. Keeping your cat indoors is one of the most important things, so they don’t get sick, and they don’t infect others. By spaying and neutering your pet, the chances of getting the infection decrease. A vet might prescribe medicine to combat and secondary infections your cat may get. Monitoring your cat is really the most important way to stay one step ahead of this disease. If FIV continues to stay un-treated, the secondary infections they already develop can lead to life-threatening diseases/conditions.

As mentioned earlier, here at Wayside, we adopt out FIV cats because we believe they provide a unique quality to someone’s life, including ours! We have five FIV positive cats currently looking for their forever home. I figured I would take this opportunity to introduce them.

This handsome man is Blackbob. You can learn more about him here. He also has a video, which you can watch here.

This dashing orange man is Jaws. You can learn more about him here. He also has a video, which you can watch here.

This chatty dude is Captain. You can learn more about him here.


This little guy is Edison. You can learn more about him here.


This cuddly boy is Carter. You can learn more about him here.

These are all of our lovely FIV boys. I personally met all of them today, and they have two things in common; FIV and being complete love bugs! What is really nice is this sign is on the back of all of their kennel cards to explain to potential adopters what FIV is. 

Along with this note, our staff and volunteers are always so helpful if anyone has questions. I recommend giving any of these boys a try, they are all so sweet!

We are closed this week due to our Mega Match event during the weekend. I’ll post those hours below.

Monday-Thursday: Closed

Friday: 10:00-7:00

Saturday: 10:00-7:00

Sunday: 12:00-6:00

Written by Teryn


Aug 4 2017

Back-To-School Tips

When August comes around, we start thinking about school. Either the back-to-school sale, school supplies list, making sure everything’s ready, or just dreading the upcoming semester. What we might not always think about is how our furry friends in the home might understand what August means. I’m going through some tips and explaining what our pets feel like during those different schedules after summer.

Not all animals will feel this way when people start going back to work and school, but some will experience sadness and loneliness. They might mope around or sleep more. Maybe your dog starts chewing on things they shouldn’t, or maybe your cat becomes more vocal or pees in the litter box. Many people will not connect this to back-to-school time. Like some people, animals like having routine because it makes them feel secure. During the summer, if kids are playing with them all day, and suddenly they go away for long hours, it can cause confusion and stress.

There are so many ways that we can prepare for to curb this anxiety your pet might feel, and it is a great teaching moment for your children! Here are some tips that can get you through this transition.

1. Transition Time

If you prepare at least one week before school starts, the animal can mentally prepare for your absence. This could be leaving your dog inside during the early hours of the morning by themselves. Only for about thirty minutes or so, and that should help simulate school time. Another good trick is to start breaking out lunch boxes or school supplies that your dog would see when you leave them. They can get used to the items and desensitize them around it, making for an easier transition. 

2. Come up with a routine.

As mentioned above, animals are all about routine, and without it they can have severe depression or separation anxiety. To avoid that, you can start a new routine for all year round, that can benefit the children, you, and your animals. The schedule should include but is not limited to feeding, bathroom breaks, walks, and exercise/play time at set times each day. You could plan for a morning walk before or after school, and cuddle time in the evening, depending on what your schedule looks like. Coming up with a routine will reduce the stress on your animal.

3. Turn on the TV/music before you leave.

I do this with my animals, because I think they worry more when it is completely quiet. We used to turn on the radio, but now we turn on the TV for them. I usually put it on cartoons because they make the most noise and they can hear happy music. Human voices or calm music helps them adjust from seeing and hearing you all day to just nighttime.

4. Prepare special toys for the environment.

With you and the kids gone, the animals have lost their favorite playmate. If you provide toys throughout the day, and switch them out to make it fun, they will be able to transition. You can also provide food puzzles so they have to play and think while eating their food. We personally hide treats around our living room so they can have that to do as well. Some people will fill a puzzle feeder or Kong toy with peanut butter or cream cheese for an extra treat. Save those “favorite” toys for when the kids come home so they can enjoy it a little more.

5. Think about Daycare.

Sometimes dropping your dog off to daycare will help them make new friends and be busy all day. Cat daycares are few and far in-between, but you can always check to see if someone does that, but cats will not be as upset as dogs will. This will allow your dog to expend some energy, while being in good care and the company of others.

6. Quality Time

It is important to re-connect with your pet at the end of a busy week. With school back in session, your dog may not get as much time playing with your family as during the care-free days of summer. Remember that even though your pet wasn’t at work or school all day, he still needs time to unwind. Consider activities like: Long walks at the park, Lounging around on the couch, Daily walks, even as the days get shorter, A weekend picnic, A weekend hike, A visit to a restaurant or establishment that allows dogs, and A special weeknight brushing.

There aren’t that many tips for keeping your pet calm and collected while going back-to-school, but this is really all it takes. August can be a stressful time for you and your family, but don’t forget about your furry friends!

Come visit Wayside Waifs!

  • Monday: CLOSED
  • Tuesday: CLOSED
  • Wednesday: Noon-8pm
  • Thursday: Noon-8pm
  • Friday: Noon-8pm
  • Saturday: 10am-6pm
  • Sunday: 1pm-6pm

Written by Teryn


Jun 30 2017

Heat Wave

While we are having a grim end to the month of June, July, as usual, promises to be the hottest month of the year for Kansas City. Our summers are hot, muggy, and wet, while our winters are chilly, dry, and windy. Being in the midwest, you get a little bit of everything here, apart from tsunamis and hurricanes. You can learn a little more about weather in this metro area here. You can also view the weather monthly here. With the upcoming heat wave, we figured now would be a good time to provide tips for protecting your pet from those harmful rays, while giving suggestions for safe fun in the sun!

1. Visit the vet for an early spring or summer checkup.

My animals coincidently have their appointments in the summer, but it helps me out because I can see how bad allergies are and my dog always gets her yearly heart-worm test. These worms are spread from host to host through mosquito bites, and are more common in the summertime. It’s also recommended that you get monthly prevention if you are in an area that has a high mosquito rate. Your vet will have the prevention to purchase at their office.

2. Always keep fresh, clean water at the ready.

This should be nothing new, but always provide a nice clean bowl of fresh water for your pet. I personally have two bowls of water in the house and one outside on our patio, if my dog wants to lay in the shade outside. If it is too hot, only take them outside for necessary potty breaks, and no need to over-exercise. We wouldn’t want you or your pet to get overheated!

3. Know the symptoms of heat stroke in your pets.

Excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse are all symptoms of heat stroke. Symptoms can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees. You’ll want to watch out for these during our high heat and humidity days! Do not leave your animals alone in a parked vehicle, it can cause a fatality!

4. Be careful about grooming your pets.

Feel free to trim longer hair on your dog, but never shave your dog: The layers of dogs’ coats protect them from overheating and sunburn. Brushing cats more often than usual can prevent problems caused by excessive heat. And be sure that any sunscreen or insect repellent product you use on your pets is labeled specifically for use on animals.

5. Check the pavement before you go on a walk.

Before you head out for a walk, touch the pavement. If it’s too hot for your hand, it’s too hot for your dog’s paw pads. Walk on the grass and stay off the asphalt. You also might want to try booties for your dog so his paws don’t burn. You can still go on walks, but staying in shaded areas of grass is really the only way to go in the heat.

Now for some fun ideas in the sun that will be both entertaining and safe for you and your furry friend!

1. Kiddie Pools

It’s summertime, and some dogs love being in the water, so why not invest in a kiddie pool?! My dog is forty-five pounds of love, and on Sunday we usually get her pool out and she has the time of her life. Always supervise your animals near water, but it’s a cheap and fun way to stay cool outside! Our first picture above is a Waif here that is enjoying their kiddie pool!

2. Ice Treats

This is always fun to make, and you can do it at home! Instead of soda flavors or fruit, you can freeze peanut butter or dog treats and give it to your pet on a hot day. It gives them something to work on, and it tastes great to them as well! Some people even freeze their toys for some extra fun times. Just make sure all the food is dog/cat friendly. 

3. Anything you can throw or toss. 

Now is the time to break out that frisbee or rope. Keep in mind that during the heat of the day, you and your dog should be inside for safety reasons, but two or three throws wouldn’t hurt. You can even do this indoors if you have the access. That way they can get ample amount of playing time while still staying cool, and you as well!

4. Sprinkler toys

Once again, some dogs really enjoy the water, and sprinklers are a cheap entertainment option. There are sprinklers you can purchase for your yard, there are dog specific sprinklers, so many different kinds! If your dog isn’t a fan of the water, they may want to sit this one out, but sometimes the price is worth it!

There you have it! Hopefully these tips for surviving in the heat and enjoying the summertime with your furry friend! Always check the weather so you nor your pet will have to suffer in the heat! Follow the links above to check Kansas City weather patterns. From all of us here at Wayside Waifs, enjoy your summer, and have a safe Fourth of July!

Adoption Hours for our campus are below. Let Freedom Ring for the animals at Wayside Waifs! It’s a grrr-eat time to adopt! Join us for our Let Freedom Ring adoption promotion starting this Wednesday, June 28 through Sunday, July 2! Half -price adoptions* for all adult dogs & cats (5 months and older), and all kittens! Adopt one kitten and the adoption fee is waived for a second kitten adoption! Hundreds of dogs, cats, puppies and kittens are ready for a second chance and a forever home! All of our adoptable pets are spay/neutered, current on age appropriate vaccinations and microchipped. You can meet all of our adoptable pets on our website. Be sure to check back daily as more animals are cleared for adoption.
*This promotion excludes puppies under 5 months of age.

Monday: CLOSED
Tuesday: CLOSED
Wednesday: Noon-8pm
Thursday: Noon-8pm
Friday: Noon-8pm
Saturday: 10am-6pm
Sunday: 1pm-6pm

Written by Teryn


Jun 23 2017

Fourth of July Safety Tips

It’s the time of year to celebrate Independence Day! It is an annual Federal holiday commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence and registering as a country, the United States of America. We typically celebrate with family, friends, fireworks, and good times. However, our furry friends don’t enjoy the holiday as much as we do, so we here at Wayside thought it would be helpful to provide tips on Fourth of July safety for our four-legged family members.

1. Have updated ID and photos of all your pets.

This goes without saying, but sometimes the animals get so nervous and scared they might try to run off and find a safe place. Having proper identification and updated photos greatly increases their chances of coming home sooner. At our store Whiskers & Wags, we sell a variety of collars and ID tags that you can purchase on campus.

2. Leave your pets at home.

To avoid something like a lost pet happening, and to ease your furry friends’ stress, consider leaving them at home for the celebration. Most pets do not want to be near fireworks when they are set off, and find the most comfort at home. Please do not lock them in the car either, because they could suffer from heat stroke and/or brain damage.

3. Don’t put insect repellant on your pet.

This also should go without saying, but if your family is having a get-together and you would like to take your pets before the fireworks show, do not put insect repellant or sunscreen on your pet. There are certain ingredients in both that are poisonous for animals, and will have effects like neurological disorders and lethargy.

4. Never leave alcoholic beverages unattended to where your pets could reach them.

Dogs and cats are naturally curious, and if a beer or cocktail is left on the ground, they might consider knocking it over and drinking it. If consumed, the animal can get intoxicated and very weak, and could even go into a coma. Put those drinks on coasters on a high-rise table so they are unable to reach it, and provide fresh water for them to drink instead.

5. Keep your pet on their normal diet.

This is the time of year when people are barbecuing more and more because the weather is nice. And keep in mind that foods such as onions, chocolate, coffee, avocado, grapes, raisins, salt and yeast dough can all be potentially toxic to companion animals. Any change, even for one meal, can give your pet severe indigestion and diarrhea.

6. Don’t give your pet access to glow jewelry. 

Glow jewelry is that super popular item that people put in freezers and wraps around your joints in place of bracelets and necklaces. While the luminescent substance contained in these products is not highly toxic, excessive drooling and gastrointestinal irritation could still result from ingestions, and intestinal blockage could occur from swallowing large pieces of the plastic containers.

7. Don’t force your pet into a costume for the holiday. 

It may seem cute to dress them up in the red, white, and blue, but unless your dog (or even less likely, your cat) loves to play dress-up, don’t push the issue. If they have a medical condition, some sort of loose clothing is definitely acceptable. Also, if your animal shuts down during the fireworks, consider purchasing a thunder shirt, which can be found at our store Whiskers & Wags. They are proven to help make animals feel safe and secure, while keeping anxiety levels down.

8. Do keep matches and lighter fluid out of the animals’ reach.

Certain types of matches contain chlorates, which could potentially damage blood cells and result in difficulty breathing—or even kidney disease in severe cases. Lighter fluid can be irritating to skin, and if ingested can produce gastrointestinal irritation and central nervous system depression. Keep those items on a high-rise table out of their reach, and all will be well!

9. Consider getting calming treats and Adaptil collars

Calming treats and Adaptil/anti-anxiety collars are both sold in our retail store Whiskers & Wags, and they have been helpful to ease stress for our animals here. The collar mimics the dogs’ natural pheromone that helps ease tension, and can help them relax during a fireworks display, as long as they are indoors. Calming treats will help do the same things, and will taste good as well!

10. Brush up on flea/tick treatment.

Ticks and fleas are more abundant than ever because of the mild winter we had. They will find a host environment in dogs and cats, and during a celebration it might go unnoticed. We also sell seresto collars which help battle unwanted visitors for up to eight months. They will help during that barbecue and high heated areas! They can be found at our retail store Whiskers & Wags.

These are just some tips that help our furry friends, and you, prepare for the celebratory holiday! Enjoy, and be safe! Our retail store Whiskers & Wags is open during our adoption hours, provided below.

Adoption Hours:

Monday: CLOSED
Tuesday: CLOSED
Wednesday: Noon-8pm
Thursday: Noon-8pm
Friday: Noon-8pm
Saturday: 10am-6pm
Sunday: 1pm-6pm

Written by Teryn


Mar 19 2014

Fido’s Spring Checklist

spring checklist As the grass begins to turn green, snowbells blossom, and the sun sets later in the evening, you and Fido may find yourselves developing a case of spring fever. The good news? With the right precautions taken, you and your pooch will be ready to spring into warmer days with a seamless transition. Employing the tips below is easy, and you’re sure to have some fun along the way.

Spring To-dos:

Up the Exercise

When it’s cold outside, many owners and canine companions get less exercise. Not to worry, though. Although your pooch doesn’t need to get in beach-worthy shape, he or she does need to get conditioned for long days of fun in the sun. The key? Like any exercise regimen, you should ease your way into full-fledged workout mode. In no time walks around the block will turn into 5-mile trail hikes.

Wash The Paws

Beds of green grass are fun for pups to roll around in, but during the spring, be careful of potentially harmful chemicals, such as herbicides, that are used for the removal of  unwanted vegetation.

Flee & Protection

Rolling around in the grass is all good fun until somebody gets a bad case of fleas or ticks. The solution? Monthly flea and tick preventative medication is best practice; however, you’ll also want to give your dog a thorough comb-through if you go for a hike in a heavily wooded area. You can purchase these products at Whiskers & Wags, Wayside’s Boutique. All proceeds from sales in the store benefit the animals at the shelter!

Groom the Coat

Spring is a time for fresh starts, so be sure to send your pet for a day at the groomers, where he or she can get a fresh cut that keeps them cool and comfortable as the weather gets warmer outside. It also helps to get in the routine of brushing them at night.  This can not only help them relax but it keeps the tangles and dander to a minimum.  And, hey, it’s great quality time together. Need some more convincing? Think how cute your pooch will look with their new hairdo!

Learn More

Looking for a furry friend to take long strolls with on breezy spring evenings? Wayside Waifs of Kansas City is home to a number of adoptable dogs and cats that are looking for their forever home, so be sure to stop by the shelter today.

Shelter Hours:

Wednesday-Friday Noon-8pm

Saturday 10am-6pm

Sunday 1pm-6pm


Mar 6 2014

How to Transition Your Dog’s Food

dog foodUnlike their human counterparts, dogs do not need to eat a rainbow (yes, keep those skittles to yourself on family movie night). Although eating food with a balanced spectrum of nutrients is important, owners should aim to consistently provide a healthy meal for their canine companions. However, as dogs mature or develop food allergies or sensitivities, you may come to a point when you need to switch dog food. Don’t panic; follow these simple steps to avoid post-breakfast or dinnertime discomfort.

Know Your Addition

In just five days, you can seamlessly transition your dog’s food. It’s simple: All you have to do is know some basic calculations for you and Fido to be on your way to a healthy new start. Begin by adding 20% of the new food in with 80% of the old. From here, you will up the new food in 20% increments each day, while simultaneously lowering the old mix by 20%. Easy, right?

See the chart below for details.

  • Day 1 – 80% Original food + 20% New
  • Day 2 – 60% Original food + 40% New
  • Day 3 – 40% Original food + 60% New
  • Day 4 – 20% Original food + 80% New
  • Day 5 – 100% New

While these proportions help most dogs make an easy transition to their new food, it is not a foolproof plan. Because of this, there are some telltale signs of irritation you’ll want to watch for throughout this process.

Red Flags:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea

*If your dog is exhibiting any of these signs, stop administering new food and visit a veterinarian as soon as possible.

When it comes time to change your dog’s food, be sure to employ the following steps. And remember, there is no universal solution for all dogs. As a pet owner, it is your responsibility to observe your dog for any unusual diet-related behavior as you make this transition.

Adopt Today

If you are looking to adopt a dog you can call your own, Wayside Waifs of Kansas City has a number of animals in need of permanent, loving homes.

 Adoption Hours:

Wednesday-Friday Noon-8pm

Saturday 10am-6pm

Sunday 1pm-6pm

 

Proudly serving the Greater Kansas City community. 


Jul 2 2013

Celebrating a Safe Fourth of July

With the fourth of July just around the corner, we know many of you will be celebrating with outdoor festivities. Wayside Waifs wanted to share some tips for helping keep your furry friends safe this upcoming holiday.

·          Never use products on your pets, such as sunscreen or insect repellent, not labeled specifically for use on animals. Products not specifically designed for animals may cause vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst, and/or lead to neurological problems.

·          Did you know alcoholic beverages have the potential to poison your pets? They can make your animal weak, depressed, comatose, and even cause respiratory failure resulting in death. The best advice, never leave an alcoholic drink unattended.

Fireworks

Tips to help keep your pets safe this fourth of July

·          If barbequing, be sure to keep matches and lighter fluid out of reach. Matches may contain chlorates, which could cause difficulty breathing or kidney disease in severe cases. Lighter fluid isn’t only an irritant to your pet’s skin but can also cause aspiration pneumonia or serious breathing problems if inhaled. 

·          Did you know food such as onions, chocolate, coffee, avocados, grapes, raisins, salt, and yeast dough can be potentially toxic for your furry family members? Please do not feed your pets anything they do not normally eat. Any changes in their diet could give them severe indigestion and diarrhea.

·          Never allow your pets to play with or wear glow jewelry. Although the fluid isn’t highly toxic, it can cause gastrointestinal irritation. The plastic container could also pose a choking hazard or intestinal blockage from swallowing.

·          If using citronella candles or other bug repellant items, keep them out of reach. They may cause stomach irritation, problems for the central nervous system, or aspiration pneumonia in your furry friends.

·          Never use fireworks around your beloved pets! Not only do they pose a risk for severe burns to curious animals, but they may also contain potentially toxic substances if ingested. 

 

The best rule of thumb, leave your pets at home this July 4th. Booms from fireworks and large crowds may also scare your pets. Be sure to place them in a cool, quiet, and escape-proof section of your home.


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