Jul 2 2013

Celebrating a Safe Fourth of July

With the fourth of July just around the corner, we know many of you will be celebrating with outdoor festivities. Wayside Waifs wanted to share some tips for helping keep your furry friends safe this upcoming holiday.

·          Never use products on your pets, such as sunscreen or insect repellent, not labeled specifically for use on animals. Products not specifically designed for animals may cause vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst, and/or lead to neurological problems.

·          Did you know alcoholic beverages have the potential to poison your pets? They can make your animal weak, depressed, comatose, and even cause respiratory failure resulting in death. The best advice, never leave an alcoholic drink unattended.

Fireworks

Tips to help keep your pets safe this fourth of July

·          If barbequing, be sure to keep matches and lighter fluid out of reach. Matches may contain chlorates, which could cause difficulty breathing or kidney disease in severe cases. Lighter fluid isn’t only an irritant to your pet’s skin but can also cause aspiration pneumonia or serious breathing problems if inhaled. 

·          Did you know food such as onions, chocolate, coffee, avocados, grapes, raisins, salt, and yeast dough can be potentially toxic for your furry family members? Please do not feed your pets anything they do not normally eat. Any changes in their diet could give them severe indigestion and diarrhea.

·          Never allow your pets to play with or wear glow jewelry. Although the fluid isn’t highly toxic, it can cause gastrointestinal irritation. The plastic container could also pose a choking hazard or intestinal blockage from swallowing.

·          If using citronella candles or other bug repellant items, keep them out of reach. They may cause stomach irritation, problems for the central nervous system, or aspiration pneumonia in your furry friends.

·          Never use fireworks around your beloved pets! Not only do they pose a risk for severe burns to curious animals, but they may also contain potentially toxic substances if ingested. 

 

The best rule of thumb, leave your pets at home this July 4th. Booms from fireworks and large crowds may also scare your pets. Be sure to place them in a cool, quiet, and escape-proof section of your home.


Oct 13 2010

No “Tricks” This Halloween- Keeping Your Pets Safe


Thinking about what costume you don this Halloween?  Perhaps a member of the Dancing With The Stars  show or maybe just keep it simple and go with the hottest Hollywood couple ?  Halloween is always fun for the little goblins and witches in your house, but it can be a dangerous time of year for our furry friends.  While some things may seem like common sense, others are things we might not even think about! 

Here are some tips to keeping your furry family members safe!

1.  No treats!  Chocolate in all forms can be very dangerous to dogs and cats.  Symptoms of ingesting significant amounts of chocolate may include: vomiting, hyperactivity, drinking excessive amounts of water, increased or frequent urination, and heart rate.  Your pet may also have seizures. 

Candies that contain the artificial sweetener Xylitol can also be poisonous to dogs.  This sweetener can cause a sudden drop in blood sugar, which leads to depression, lack of coordination and seizures.  Significant low blood sugar can also cause liver failure.

Watch those wrappers!  Ingesting the foil or cellophane wrappers can be a choking hazard or intestinal blockage.

2. Pumpkins and decorative corn can cause gastrointestinal upset and can even cause intestinal blockage.  Also watch carved pumpkins with lit candles inside!  Pets can easily knock over pumpkins and cause a fire.  Curious cats are especially at risk or getting burned by lit candles.  My curious calico actually burnt her whiskers when she got too curious about a lit candle.  Needless to say she now steers clear and we have taken to using reed diffusers instead of candles.   

3.  Keep all wires and cords from electric lights and other decorations out of reach from your pets.  If your pet chews the cords, they could have damage in the mouth or electrical shock.

4. Everyone loves to dress up for Halloween and it can be fun to get your pet a costume too.  Please don’t put your pet in a costume unless you know he or she loves it.  My poodle loves to wear clothes, but some pets find it extremely stressful.  Be mindful of how your pet is feeling.

If you do dress your pet in a costume, make sure it isn’t constricting their movements, hearing or ability to breathe, bark or meow.  I would also recommend trying on costumes prior to the big night, that way if  your pet is stressed, uncomfortable or allergic you know before the big night. 

Also check the costume for buttons, dangling accessories/accents or pieces that could be chewed off easily.  These all pose not only choking hazards but could also cause intestinal blockages. 

5. Not all dogs and cats are social and excessive knocks on the door, or doorbell can be stressful.  It is recommended that you put your pet in another room, away from trick or treating during peak hours.  The first year we had our toy poodle I thought it would be good to let her run around the house and see the kids when they came to the door.  I mean, she LOVES kids.  Unfortunately every time she heard the doorbell she went into a barking/attack mode.  To this day every time she hears a doorbell, even if it’s on the television, she goes berserk!  It was a big mistake to let her be around this commotion before she was ready.

Also be careful of opening the door- this is a prime opportunity for your pet to dart off or scare small children who are unaware you have a pet. 

6.  As always, make sure your pet has identification and is micro-chipped.  If your pet should escape or become lost this will increase the chances that you will be able to find them.

7.  Consider keeping your pet indoors.  Halloween is a prime time for pranksters who might taunt, injure or even take your pet. 

Halloween can be a fun time for the entire family, just be extra mindful of your furry family members and what tricks or treats they are enjoying!

Written by Trish Stinger
Web Marketing Manager at Wayside Waifs


Jun 25 2010

Keeping Your Pets Cool This Summer

Summer heat has come early for us this year!  Our furry friends don’t always handle the heat well.   The heat effects dogs and cats the same way it impacts humans.  Dogs and cats can suffer from the same problems that humans do, such as overheating, dehydration and even sunburn. By taking some simple precautions, you can celebrate the season and keep your pets happy and healthy.

1. Keep pets inside.

2. Never leave your pet alone in a vehicle—heat exhaustion can be fatal. Even with the windows open, a parked automobile can quickly become a furnace in no time.  During warm weather the temperature inside a car can rise to 120 degrees in a matter of minutes.  Think about how hot it gets when you park your car and run into the store to grab something.  Even leaving the windows down is not enough.  You wouldn’t leave your children in the car- please don’t leave your pets!

3. Walk your dog in the morning when the heat and humidity are best.  

4. Don’t let your dog stand on hot asphalt.  Their body temperature can rise quickly and sensitive paw pads can burn.

5. Get a long hair dog groomed for the summer.  Long haired breeds can be shaved to a one-inch coat.  Never shave down to the skin as this robs the dog of their protection from the sun.

6. Be sensitive to older and overweight animals in hot weather. Snub-nosed dogs such as bulldogs, pugs, Boston terriers, Lhasa apsos and shih tzus, as well as those with heart or lung diseases, should be kept cool in air-conditioned rooms as much as possible. 

7. Do not apply any sunscreen or insect repellent product to your pet that is not labeled specifically for use on animals. While you do want to protect pets that have light-colored noses or light-colored fur on their ears, ingestion of sunscreen products can result in drooling, diarrhea, excessive thirst and lethargy. The misuse of insect repellent that contains DEET can lead to neurological problems.

8. Avoid taking your pet to events where there are crowds, like concerts and fairs.  The loud noise combined with the heat can be extremely stressful and dangerous for our furry friends.  Trust me, your pet will thank you later.

If your dog or cat is exposed to high temperatures:
.

1. Pay attention to signs of over-heating and heat stress.  Heavy panting, glazed eyes, increased pulse, staggering, throwing up, unsteady walking are all signs.  Also check our pets tongue- a deep red or purple tongues is another sign. 

2. If your pet is overheated, you must lower their body temperature immediately. 

3.  Take your pet to a shaded area and put cool, not cold, water all over their body to gradually lower their body temperature.

4.  Apply ice pack or cool towels to your pet’s head, neck and chest only.

5. Let your pet drink small amounts of cool water or lick ice cubes. 

6. Finally, always visit and consult with your veterinarian.  This tips are only a recommendation, and you should always consult with your personal veterinarian about your pets health.
.

Written by Trish Stinger
Web Marketing Manager at Wayside Waifs

 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 


Powered by WordPress, Created by Spur Communications