Jun 8 2015

Calling All Cat Lovers!

Felinecarevol_hero

Who would not love to start their day with kittens, upon kittens, upon kittens? We are looking for a special group of volunteers to help us with this crucial shelter role. Keeping the shelter clean and our animals healthy is a big responsibility. Support is needed each day of the week from 8- 11am. We know it is early in the morning, but you will have other smiling and happy faces to work with while you are here. Do you know anyone else who loves cats? Volunteering with cats and friends is doubly rewarding.

Here are the details about what you would be doing. Keep in mind this is a short term commitment and your care will help these felines in their journey to finding a forever home!

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Volunteers will be asked to commit to a once a weekly schedule. All days of the week are available, even weekends. Shifts are 8am – 11am. Anyone interested in volunteering, but not interested in this specific opportunity, should sign up for our general program at waysidewaifs.org

To get started helping our kitties, sign up for one of these classes be emailing AnnMarie Thomas, athomas@waysidewaifs.org. Please note in your email which shift you are interested in filling or if you are interested in volunteering for more than one day.

*These classes are ONLY for the Feline Comfort Support volunteer position.

June 13th 8am – 11am

OR

June 15th 8am – 11am

Feline Comfort Support Volunteers support the Feline Care Techs (FCT) with a variety of tasks. These include cleaning and sanitizing kennels, picking up and distributing blankets/toys, and providing food and water. Volunteers will be provided with general volunteer training and one on one mentoring to ensure success in this position!

Purpose:

  • This is a partnership of volunteers and staff working to provide the best quality of life for the cats at Wayside.
  • Support feline socialization and the importance of touch.
  • Decrease shelter stress and the spread of disease.
  • Apply consistent deep cleaning techniques for kennels once they are vacated.
  • Provide cats with basic necessities, clean surroundings, and toys for mental stimulation.
  • Overall – Increase the adoptability, health, and welfare of cats at Wayside Waifs.

Have questions? Contact AnnMarie Thomas, athomas@waysidewaifs.org.

Abner

 


Dec 18 2013

Paw-Lick’n Holiday Pet Treats

If you are looking for some paw-lickin’ holiday treats for your family pet, there is no need to head to the pet store. It only takes a few ingredients to make some of your own tail-waggin’ holiday treats. When it comes to pets, the little things can make a difference – holiday pet treats are no exception. So, next time you and your family pet are in the kitchen, be sure to try out one of these pet-friendly holiday treats. 

DIY Holiday Pet Treats:

For the Canine…

Dog Bark

If you have ever slipped your four-legged friend a morsel of cheese or let him or her lick your peanut butter-clad hands clean, you know how much pups love their people food.  This all-in-one treat is the real deal. With cheese, peanut butter, and bacon, what’s not to love? In less than forty minutes, your pooch could be enjoying some of their very own holiday Dog Bark.

Dog Nog

Add Dog Nog to the mix for some extra holiday cheer. Good news about this seasonal recipe? Your pooch doesn’t have to be 21 in dog years to enjoy it. Dog Nog is sure to keep your pup safely hydrated and happy. This holiday treat earned brownie points for its simplicity – something every pet owner can appreciate. By the time your pooch can say ”Dog Nog,” this delicious dog elixir will be ready to drink. All you need is baby food, low-fat, organic yogurt, eggs, water, and –for good measure—a banana slice.

For the Feline…

Tuna Crackers

If your kitten has behaved well all year, reward Santa’s little helper with something savory and nutritious. When you are leaving a special delight by the tree for the big man on the sleigh this year, prepare some goodies for your kitty, too. These tuna crackers are comprised of canned tuna, cornmeal, flour, and water. This holiday treat is cat-friendly and easy-to-make. In fact, these holiday treats are so simple to prepare that these kitty crackers can be enjoyed year round.

Cat Cakes

holiday gifts

Cats have always had a flair for the dramatic, which makes cat cakes the purr-fect treat for your kitten. This holiday season spoil your cat by preparing a truly fancy feast. The flour and tuna-filled cat cakes are delicious holiday gifts that your family feline can enjoy for days to come. For details about this one-of-a-kind holiday treat, reference the complete recipe.

At Wayside Waifs, we remain dedicated to helping you provide your family pets with quality care.  Want to shower your pup or cat with even more holiday love?

For more holiday treats, be sure to visit Whiskers & Wags, our pet boutique that helps support the rescue animals in our care.  


Oct 5 2009

Shaving Isn’t Just for Dogs Anymore!


Shaving cats seems like a foreign idea to most, but in reality it is becoming more and more common.  Living with all the hair a cat can shed throughout his/her life can be a big turn off to many.  Seeing the cat hair roll across the floor like tumble weeds, the constant hacking up of fur balls, or the hair on your clothes can become a deal breaker.  Some people are allergic to cat hair.  To live peacefully with our feline friends, one option I can suggest is shaving.  For some breeds, this can even be a necessity.

Most cats do not like the loud noise caused by a shaver or the vibrating of it next to their skin.  Precautions must be taken so you and your cat don’t get hurt.  Cats have thinner skin than most dogs and are easily cut by blades.  In order to prevent a painful wound, the right blade and proper technique must be used.  Plus, if you accidentally cut a cat, chances are the cat will never want another blade on them in the future.  I suggest having a professional groomer show you how to properly groom a cat and have them groom your cat the first few times.  This will hopefully allow your cat to become comfortable with the grooming process. 

A groomer might use a cat muzzle, which may appear to be inhumane or mean, but cats respond heavily to the visual stimuli.  A cat muzzle can prevent them from seeing a shaver and reacting due to fear.  You also need to protect yourself from cat bites.  Cat’s teeth are extremely sharp and a cat bite can cause serious pain and a nasty infection.  If you are unsure how your cat will react to grooming, a cat muzzle is a must tool.

Some cat breeds must be groomed regularly.  Persians, Himalayans and other long haired breeds cannot fully take care of themselves by licking.  Some have softer, cotton-like coats, which are easily tangled.  Grooming is an easy remedy to these minor issues.  Plus, there are a variety of really cute cuts.  The most common is the lion trim.  It leaves the head, legs and tail long.  This is an adorable cut that leaves most people in awe.  Let’s not forget about the short haired cats.  It is acceptable to shave them and can make them more comfortable as well.  If you are thinking of adopting a cat but you do not want to deal with the hair, or if you already have a cat who is constantly shedding, consider shaving them.  Shaving isn’t just for dogs anymore!

Written by Kristin Sampson
Foster Care Coordinator at Wayside Waifs


Aug 20 2009

The Ultimate Litter-Box Solution

It’s arguably the least pleasant aspect of your feline family member–cleaning out the litter box. And because we encourage you to keep your cats indoors for their safety and health, you can’t avoid this chore. Or can you?

I’ve heard rumors for years that cats can be taught to use the toilet. I never tried it with ours, figuring that she was an old-lady cat whose arthritis might preclude such a feat. But the idea is intriguing, and thanks to YouTube, I’ve seen actual proof that this is possible.

Can any cat be toilet-trained? Personally, I think that cats are such independent, unique creatures that perhaps quite a few can’t be persuaded to depart from the litter-box habit. But maybe yours has the right stuff. Does he fit this profile?

  • fairly easygoing; not too freaked by changes in routine
  • motivated by treats/training to do what you want
  • already litter-trained
  • still a kitten (probably easier than training an adult)
  • not a tiny kitten (must be big enough to avoid falling in)

If your cat seems toilet-friendly, and you have the time and patience, check out this how-to article. Products are available to make the process easier, but jazz musician Charles Mingus  swears by good old-fashioned cardboard boxes to do the trick. If you give this a try with your kitty, let us know how it works! Good luck!

posted by Claire M. Caterer


Jul 6 2009

Those Lazy Days of Summer

Not a recommended toy for kitty. Image by © Royalty-Free/Corbis

Not a recommended toy for kitty. Image by © Royalty-Free/Corbis

What did your cat do today? Let me guess. Long yoga stretch,  ear shake, house patrol (stop at litter box), drink of water, brief snack, catnap in a square of sunshine. Repeat.  

Sometimes I marvel at how much time our pets spend sleeping. Cats actually sleep about 16 hours a day, although a lot of the time they’re semi-alert while napping. Either way, they don’t look like they’re doing much.  

A boring life? Well, maybe. For the eight hours a day that your cat’s awake, she’ll want some kind of fun. Often that will be laptime or scratching-post therapy. But your kitty comes from a noble lineage of predators. And since most of our cats aren’t kept in the barn with a colony of mice, you need to help your cat satisfy that urge.  

For the modern housecat, the predator urge comes out as playtime. Your cat likes to stalk, pounce, chase, and fight. Not only does it release energy (which otherwise might be channeled into destructive behavior), playing stimulates a cat’s complex brain and provides needed exercise. And while a cat enjoys some playtime alone, his relationship to you will be enhanced through interactive play. Make a habit of checking out the toy aisle when picking up the catfood, and think about ways to vary your cat’s environment. If you’re convinced your cat “never plays with anything,” maybe you haven’t found the right kind of toy. Be creative and note what your cat likes to do–hide, run, stalk? Chase the sunlight rainbows from your prism chandelier? Coax him out of his summertime lethargy if you can. It will do you both good.  

For some great ideas on playtime for cats, visit Jackie Fuchs’s page on Examiner.com.

posted by Claire M. Caterer


May 4 2009

Flea Prevention Starts Now

Regular bathing and brushing can help keep fleas at bay. (Image by © Royalty-Free/Corbis)

Regular bathing and brushing can help keep fleas at bay. (Image by © Royalty-Free/Corbis)

Finally enjoying some warm weather? Chances are your pets are too. As the foliage greens up, shrubbery and undergrowth become denser, and the grass gets longer, another creature shows up for a romp: the flea.

Prevention is the best way to deal with these pesky creatures. Once they get a firm hold of your pet, they’ll end up on carpets, upholstery, bedding–and you. Eradication at that stage is a migraine waiting to happen, so take action now, when fleas are just starting to lay eggs.

If you’ve had flea problems in the past, or your yard has a lot of dense undergrowth, consider a yard application as well as direct prevention on your pet. Concentrated liquid insecticides that you apply with a garden hose work well and are available at hardware stores and home and garden centers. Because the KC metro has a long warm season, two applications will probably be necessary.

In the house, be sure a dog or cat’s bedding is washed in very hot water weekly during flea season. Vacuum frequently and empty vacuum-cleaner bags right away. While this will cut down on fleas taking hold in the house, you’ll need an indoor insecticide if you’ve actually seen fleas on pets or furniture.

Finally, and most important, your dog, cat, or other mammal needs its own flea prevention if spending lots of time outdoors. Recent research has brought up concerns over the safety of over-the-counter topical flea preventatives, which have shown to be toxic in some cases to animals and humans. Veterinarian-prescribed preventatives have fared much better in safety tests and still are considered the best option for direct flea prevention for mammals. But to be safe, consider these factors:

  • Products are not interchangeable. Follow directions for species and weight of each pet.
  • Administer the product exactly as the manufacturer recommends.
  • Ill, pregnant, and elderly pets may be poor candidates for topical flea preventatives.
  • Check with your vet before using any chemical product, particularly those available over the counter.

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