Mar 2 2011

A blog for the dogs…and kitty cats too

There are always plenty of dogs and cats who need help…and a home. 

In fact, lately we’ve had a growing number of dogs and cats in need of rescue. The thing is, providing good care and getting them placed in a loving home takes time and, well, it’s not cheap.

If you’ve been to the shelter you know that we do our best for every animal who comes through our doors. Watching them in action, it’s clear that our staff and volunteers are the best and it shows in the dogs and cats we rescue. They get medical care, vaccines, fun toys, comfortable beds, plenty of good food and play time. We do our best so they’re healthier, happier and ready to go when a loving family wants to take them home. 

To make sure we always have everything needed for their stay, we’ve started the Best Friends Monthly Giving program. When you join the Best Friends family, your monthly contributions will  provide ongoing support to the thousands of animals we save every year. You’ll help us perform spay and neuter surgeries, take care of those nasty fleas and ticks, buy squeaky toys and comfy beds, and keep all the  food bowls full. 

As our way of saying thanks for being a part of the Best Friends family, we’ll send you our monthly eNewsletter, The Fire Hydrant, filled with great stuff, including a discount code you can use at our retail store, Whiskers and Wags. There will be other howlin’ good offers throughout the year, too, just to remind you how much we appreciate your ongoing support. 

We hope you will consider joining the Best Friends family right now so we can keep doing great work for the dogs and cats who need us. It doesn’t take much each month to make a big difference. Sign up now to get started.  

Thanks for being a part of our important work and making dreams come true.

Written by Marla Svoboda
Vice President,
Marketing and Development at Wayside Waifs


Aug 3 2010

Foster Feature: Meet Hot Pocket

Meet Hot Pocket

Meet Hot Pocket

“There’s a dog in the vet clinic that needs to be put in your area” she said. I work in a sectioned off area of the shelter where animals that have medical issues, behavior problems or are too young to be adopted usually reside. I headed down the hall to the vet clinic trying to think of what this dogs problem might be; a broken leg, a bad upper respiratory infection, maybe just a bad attitude. When I saw her I couldn’t believe my eyes. She was covered in scabs, pustules, pimples and had reddened dry splotchy skin. One look in her eyes and I knew I had to help her. I immediately put on the baby blue gown, sported some white surgical gloves and picked her up. She looked so sad,

“What’s her name?”
“Hot Pocket”

Someone had dropped her off in the Wayside parking lot; dismissing her and the medical attention she so desperately needed. The way she leaned in to me and looked in to my eyes told me that she knew I was helping her.

Since no one knew whether she was contagious or not, I couldn’t take her home right away. So, I spoiled her in every other way I knew how. She got plush dog beds, plenty of toys and a lot of love. I could never touch her with my bare hands, in case she was contagious- so every day for about an hour I would get in to my fashionable garb of medical scrubs and sit with her. She didn’t want to play much since she wasn’t in the best of health; most of the time was spent with her sleeping in my lap while I would try my best not to hurt her as I pet her scabby head, and held her dry irritated body. 

Once she was medically cleared as not being contagious I got all of the items she would need together and took her home. As we got into the car I put her in her crate and hoped for the best. She cried and potty’d almost immediately. “Oh no, what am I getting myself in to?” I work with puppies on a daily basis but I’ve never wanted to take one home because I know how much work they are. Plus, how were my room mate’s two dogs going to react to her? I found out once I got home; Cooper, the Springer Spaniel mix immediately warmed up to her. If she sneezed, he licked her face. If she coughed, he cuddled with her. She nipped, pawed, barked and walked all over him and he loved every minute of it. 

With a new boyfriend in tow, Hot Pocket made herself at home. She never potty’d in the house (or her crate), she always let me get a full 8 hours of sleep, and she started learning new commands instantly! As far as puppies go, Hot Pocket was as close to perfect as they come! She loves every dog she comes in to contact with and every person she meets falls in love with her gentle, playful puppy nature. 

Hot Pocket is now making a full recovery and is a beautiful, gorgeous eyed little girl. Had it not been for the fostering program offered at Wayside I would never have been able to get her back to full health and show her what it’s like to be loved. Fostering gives me a feeling of need and a sense of accomplishment. Since I work at Wayside I get to see first hand how much fostering makes a difference; it’s phenomenal. And Hot Pocket is one of the best examples I have to show that.

Written by Alyssa Willet
Puppy Nursery Caretaker at Wayside Waifs


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