Aug 11 2017

FIV: Fabulous, Invincible, and Valuable

FIV(Feline Immunodeficiency Virus) is a complex retrovirus that causes immunodeficiency disease in domestic cats. In non-fancy jargon, basically the cat’s body is unable to properly protect the immune system. As a result of immunodeficiency, most infected cats do not show symptoms and have a normal life expectancy, but they are prone to developing other infections and certain types of cancer. We adopt out FIV positive cats, and I just want to showcase how great they are, by explaining their unique quality.

A retrovirus, such as FIV, is slow-moving and can lay dormant in the body for months and even years. That is why most infected cats do not show symptoms right away and live a normal life expectancy. Many people compare it to the human virus HIV(Human Immunodeficiency Virus.) Genetics may or may not play a role in if a cat is more susceptible in getting the virus. The average age is five years at the time of diagnosis, and the likelihood of infection increases with age.

FIV is mainly passed from cat to cat through deep bite wounds, the kind that usually occur outdoors during aggressive fights and territorial disputes-the perfect reason to keep your cat inside. Another less common way is if the mother of a litter is FIV positive. She may pass that down to one or more of her kittens, which is where genetics comes into play. FIV is more common in males because of the more aggressive tendencies males get in terms of defending themselves in the outdoor territory, but female cats can get it as well. Cats who live indoors are the least likely to be infected. The most common cat that will get FIV is an un-altered, free-roaming, outdoor male cat who fights.

People cannot catch FIV, only from cat to cat. As mentioned above, symptoms take years to develop, but some of those are fever, weight loss,  anemia, dental disease, and sneezing, to name a few. If you think your cat has FIV, you should schedule an appointment with your veterinarian to get them tested. FIV infection is determined through a blood test, and sometimes they require another test be done later on for confirmation.

At this moment, there is no cure for FIV, but it is very manageable. There is a vaccine, but it does not protect all cats. Keeping your cat indoors is one of the most important things, so they don’t get sick, and they don’t infect others. By spaying and neutering your pet, the chances of getting the infection decrease. A vet might prescribe medicine to combat and secondary infections your cat may get. Monitoring your cat is really the most important way to stay one step ahead of this disease. If FIV continues to stay un-treated, the secondary infections they already develop can lead to life-threatening diseases/conditions.

As mentioned earlier, here at Wayside, we adopt out FIV cats because we believe they provide a unique quality to someone’s life, including ours! We have five FIV positive cats currently looking for their forever home. I figured I would take this opportunity to introduce them.

This handsome man is Blackbob. You can learn more about him here. He also has a video, which you can watch here.

This dashing orange man is Jaws. You can learn more about him here. He also has a video, which you can watch here.

This chatty dude is Captain. You can learn more about him here.


This little guy is Edison. You can learn more about him here.


This cuddly boy is Carter. You can learn more about him here.

These are all of our lovely FIV boys. I personally met all of them today, and they have two things in common; FIV and being complete love bugs! What is really nice is this sign is on the back of all of their kennel cards to explain to potential adopters what FIV is. 

Along with this note, our staff and volunteers are always so helpful if anyone has questions. I recommend giving any of these boys a try, they are all so sweet!

We are closed this week due to our Mega Match event during the weekend. I’ll post those hours below.

Monday-Thursday: Closed

Friday: 10:00-7:00

Saturday: 10:00-7:00

Sunday: 12:00-6:00

Written by Teryn


Aug 4 2017

Back-To-School Tips

When August comes around, we start thinking about school. Either the back-to-school sale, school supplies list, making sure everything’s ready, or just dreading the upcoming semester. What we might not always think about is how our furry friends in the home might understand what August means. I’m going through some tips and explaining what our pets feel like during those different schedules after summer.

Not all animals will feel this way when people start going back to work and school, but some will experience sadness and loneliness. They might mope around or sleep more. Maybe your dog starts chewing on things they shouldn’t, or maybe your cat becomes more vocal or pees in the litter box. Many people will not connect this to back-to-school time. Like some people, animals like having routine because it makes them feel secure. During the summer, if kids are playing with them all day, and suddenly they go away for long hours, it can cause confusion and stress.

There are so many ways that we can prepare for to curb this anxiety your pet might feel, and it is a great teaching moment for your children! Here are some tips that can get you through this transition.

1. Transition Time

If you prepare at least one week before school starts, the animal can mentally prepare for your absence. This could be leaving your dog inside during the early hours of the morning by themselves. Only for about thirty minutes or so, and that should help simulate school time. Another good trick is to start breaking out lunch boxes or school supplies that your dog would see when you leave them. They can get used to the items and desensitize them around it, making for an easier transition. 

2. Come up with a routine.

As mentioned above, animals are all about routine, and without it they can have severe depression or separation anxiety. To avoid that, you can start a new routine for all year round, that can benefit the children, you, and your animals. The schedule should include but is not limited to feeding, bathroom breaks, walks, and exercise/play time at set times each day. You could plan for a morning walk before or after school, and cuddle time in the evening, depending on what your schedule looks like. Coming up with a routine will reduce the stress on your animal.

3. Turn on the TV/music before you leave.

I do this with my animals, because I think they worry more when it is completely quiet. We used to turn on the radio, but now we turn on the TV for them. I usually put it on cartoons because they make the most noise and they can hear happy music. Human voices or calm music helps them adjust from seeing and hearing you all day to just nighttime.

4. Prepare special toys for the environment.

With you and the kids gone, the animals have lost their favorite playmate. If you provide toys throughout the day, and switch them out to make it fun, they will be able to transition. You can also provide food puzzles so they have to play and think while eating their food. We personally hide treats around our living room so they can have that to do as well. Some people will fill a puzzle feeder or Kong toy with peanut butter or cream cheese for an extra treat. Save those “favorite” toys for when the kids come home so they can enjoy it a little more.

5. Think about Daycare.

Sometimes dropping your dog off to daycare will help them make new friends and be busy all day. Cat daycares are few and far in-between, but you can always check to see if someone does that, but cats will not be as upset as dogs will. This will allow your dog to expend some energy, while being in good care and the company of others.

6. Quality Time

It is important to re-connect with your pet at the end of a busy week. With school back in session, your dog may not get as much time playing with your family as during the care-free days of summer. Remember that even though your pet wasn’t at work or school all day, he still needs time to unwind. Consider activities like: Long walks at the park, Lounging around on the couch, Daily walks, even as the days get shorter, A weekend picnic, A weekend hike, A visit to a restaurant or establishment that allows dogs, and A special weeknight brushing.

There aren’t that many tips for keeping your pet calm and collected while going back-to-school, but this is really all it takes. August can be a stressful time for you and your family, but don’t forget about your furry friends!

Come visit Wayside Waifs!

  • Monday: CLOSED
  • Tuesday: CLOSED
  • Wednesday: Noon-8pm
  • Thursday: Noon-8pm
  • Friday: Noon-8pm
  • Saturday: 10am-6pm
  • Sunday: 1pm-6pm

Written by Teryn


Jul 7 2017

Inside Scoop: Feline Care Department

I have worked at Wayside for almost three years now, and something I’ve noticed is whenever I speak to the general public about working here, they are interested in the animals, but they are also curious about the inside jobs of staff and volunteers. Today, I’ve decided to highlight the Feline Care Department. Kitten Season is a time when shelters see an increase in pregnant adult cats and many young kittens who need extra care. During the summer months, kitten season is at an all-time high, but the feline care team are prepared for anything.

_MG_7412

This is Sarah, a previous adoptions counselor who switched departments because it worked better for her schedule. Here she is pictured caring for Ford, who is sick with a mild upper respiratory infection. We were discussing her favorite part of the job, and as soon as she opened Ford’s door, he went in for snuggles.

“This. This is the best.” Sarah went on to say that, “In Adoptions, we knew the big picture of taking care of the animals, but I didn’t know there was this much that goes into it. It’s nice to see their journey and to help them along the way.”

_MG_7406

I asked Sarah what the feline care team is doing to prepare for kitten season.

“Honestly, we are going with the flow for now. We have space still, so we are always prepared for something different everyday. We also are watching for illness more than the usual amount. With moms and kittens, their immune systems are weakened, so I look for signs of illness immediately.”

_MG_7400

This is Lauretta, another previous adoptions counselor turn feline care technician. Lauretta switched departments for a full-time position, and is enjoying the new job. Here she is getting a fresh litter box for some kittens in our Kitten Nursery ward. That room is usually designated for pregnant or nursing mothers and kittens. Lauretta typically worked in cat adoptions, but she enjoys seeing their journey throughout their stay.

“I honestly like seeing how they grow throughout their stay here. They either need help with their shyness or they need medical treatment, or maybe they just want cuddles. I like seeing their progress.” She also thinks cats in general are pretty great!

_MG_7402

 

This is less than half of our other feline care technicians. We also have team members Shannon, Chris, Sheila, and the feline care manager Bonnie. They are all fantastic in what they do and give 110% in caring for our cats. Bonnie had some insight as to what it is like managing such a wonderful department, and what her favorite part is!

“I would have to say when staff thinks outside the box or takes initiative to do more or to find a way to improve a process. Growth for them.”

Many shelters are already full, but kitten season promises to be as lively as ever. Consider brushing up on your city’s animal control policies and contact shelters to see their availability. Be cautious if you have a raised deck, and check under your car before driving and around the tires. Mother cats often try to find hard to reach places to protect their litter. Most importantly, stay cool out there!

52-300x300

Adoption Hours:

 

  • Monday: CLOSED
  • Tuesday: CLOSED
  • Wednesday: Noon-8pm
  • Thursday: Noon-8pm
  • Friday: Noon-8pm
  • Saturday: 10am-6pm
  • Sunday: 1pm-6pm

Written by Teryn


Jun 30 2017

Heat Wave

While we are having a grim end to the month of June, July, as usual, promises to be the hottest month of the year for Kansas City. Our summers are hot, muggy, and wet, while our winters are chilly, dry, and windy. Being in the midwest, you get a little bit of everything here, apart from tsunamis and hurricanes. You can learn a little more about weather in this metro area here. You can also view the weather monthly here. With the upcoming heat wave, we figured now would be a good time to provide tips for protecting your pet from those harmful rays, while giving suggestions for safe fun in the sun!

1. Visit the vet for an early spring or summer checkup.

My animals coincidently have their appointments in the summer, but it helps me out because I can see how bad allergies are and my dog always gets her yearly heart-worm test. These worms are spread from host to host through mosquito bites, and are more common in the summertime. It’s also recommended that you get monthly prevention if you are in an area that has a high mosquito rate. Your vet will have the prevention to purchase at their office.

2. Always keep fresh, clean water at the ready.

This should be nothing new, but always provide a nice clean bowl of fresh water for your pet. I personally have two bowls of water in the house and one outside on our patio, if my dog wants to lay in the shade outside. If it is too hot, only take them outside for necessary potty breaks, and no need to over-exercise. We wouldn’t want you or your pet to get overheated!

3. Know the symptoms of heat stroke in your pets.

Excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse are all symptoms of heat stroke. Symptoms can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees. You’ll want to watch out for these during our high heat and humidity days! Do not leave your animals alone in a parked vehicle, it can cause a fatality!

4. Be careful about grooming your pets.

Feel free to trim longer hair on your dog, but never shave your dog: The layers of dogs’ coats protect them from overheating and sunburn. Brushing cats more often than usual can prevent problems caused by excessive heat. And be sure that any sunscreen or insect repellent product you use on your pets is labeled specifically for use on animals.

5. Check the pavement before you go on a walk.

Before you head out for a walk, touch the pavement. If it’s too hot for your hand, it’s too hot for your dog’s paw pads. Walk on the grass and stay off the asphalt. You also might want to try booties for your dog so his paws don’t burn. You can still go on walks, but staying in shaded areas of grass is really the only way to go in the heat.

Now for some fun ideas in the sun that will be both entertaining and safe for you and your furry friend!

1. Kiddie Pools

It’s summertime, and some dogs love being in the water, so why not invest in a kiddie pool?! My dog is forty-five pounds of love, and on Sunday we usually get her pool out and she has the time of her life. Always supervise your animals near water, but it’s a cheap and fun way to stay cool outside! Our first picture above is a Waif here that is enjoying their kiddie pool!

2. Ice Treats

This is always fun to make, and you can do it at home! Instead of soda flavors or fruit, you can freeze peanut butter or dog treats and give it to your pet on a hot day. It gives them something to work on, and it tastes great to them as well! Some people even freeze their toys for some extra fun times. Just make sure all the food is dog/cat friendly. 

3. Anything you can throw or toss. 

Now is the time to break out that frisbee or rope. Keep in mind that during the heat of the day, you and your dog should be inside for safety reasons, but two or three throws wouldn’t hurt. You can even do this indoors if you have the access. That way they can get ample amount of playing time while still staying cool, and you as well!

4. Sprinkler toys

Once again, some dogs really enjoy the water, and sprinklers are a cheap entertainment option. There are sprinklers you can purchase for your yard, there are dog specific sprinklers, so many different kinds! If your dog isn’t a fan of the water, they may want to sit this one out, but sometimes the price is worth it!

There you have it! Hopefully these tips for surviving in the heat and enjoying the summertime with your furry friend! Always check the weather so you nor your pet will have to suffer in the heat! Follow the links above to check Kansas City weather patterns. From all of us here at Wayside Waifs, enjoy your summer, and have a safe Fourth of July!

Adoption Hours for our campus are below. Let Freedom Ring for the animals at Wayside Waifs! It’s a grrr-eat time to adopt! Join us for our Let Freedom Ring adoption promotion starting this Wednesday, June 28 through Sunday, July 2! Half -price adoptions* for all adult dogs & cats (5 months and older), and all kittens! Adopt one kitten and the adoption fee is waived for a second kitten adoption! Hundreds of dogs, cats, puppies and kittens are ready for a second chance and a forever home! All of our adoptable pets are spay/neutered, current on age appropriate vaccinations and microchipped. You can meet all of our adoptable pets on our website. Be sure to check back daily as more animals are cleared for adoption.
*This promotion excludes puppies under 5 months of age.

Monday: CLOSED
Tuesday: CLOSED
Wednesday: Noon-8pm
Thursday: Noon-8pm
Friday: Noon-8pm
Saturday: 10am-6pm
Sunday: 1pm-6pm

Written by Teryn


Jun 23 2017

Fourth of July Safety Tips

It’s the time of year to celebrate Independence Day! It is an annual Federal holiday commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence and registering as a country, the United States of America. We typically celebrate with family, friends, fireworks, and good times. However, our furry friends don’t enjoy the holiday as much as we do, so we here at Wayside thought it would be helpful to provide tips on Fourth of July safety for our four-legged family members.

1. Have updated ID and photos of all your pets.

This goes without saying, but sometimes the animals get so nervous and scared they might try to run off and find a safe place. Having proper identification and updated photos greatly increases their chances of coming home sooner. At our store Whiskers & Wags, we sell a variety of collars and ID tags that you can purchase on campus.

2. Leave your pets at home.

To avoid something like a lost pet happening, and to ease your furry friends’ stress, consider leaving them at home for the celebration. Most pets do not want to be near fireworks when they are set off, and find the most comfort at home. Please do not lock them in the car either, because they could suffer from heat stroke and/or brain damage.

3. Don’t put insect repellant on your pet.

This also should go without saying, but if your family is having a get-together and you would like to take your pets before the fireworks show, do not put insect repellant or sunscreen on your pet. There are certain ingredients in both that are poisonous for animals, and will have effects like neurological disorders and lethargy.

4. Never leave alcoholic beverages unattended to where your pets could reach them.

Dogs and cats are naturally curious, and if a beer or cocktail is left on the ground, they might consider knocking it over and drinking it. If consumed, the animal can get intoxicated and very weak, and could even go into a coma. Put those drinks on coasters on a high-rise table so they are unable to reach it, and provide fresh water for them to drink instead.

5. Keep your pet on their normal diet.

This is the time of year when people are barbecuing more and more because the weather is nice. And keep in mind that foods such as onions, chocolate, coffee, avocado, grapes, raisins, salt and yeast dough can all be potentially toxic to companion animals. Any change, even for one meal, can give your pet severe indigestion and diarrhea.

6. Don’t give your pet access to glow jewelry. 

Glow jewelry is that super popular item that people put in freezers and wraps around your joints in place of bracelets and necklaces. While the luminescent substance contained in these products is not highly toxic, excessive drooling and gastrointestinal irritation could still result from ingestions, and intestinal blockage could occur from swallowing large pieces of the plastic containers.

7. Don’t force your pet into a costume for the holiday. 

It may seem cute to dress them up in the red, white, and blue, but unless your dog (or even less likely, your cat) loves to play dress-up, don’t push the issue. If they have a medical condition, some sort of loose clothing is definitely acceptable. Also, if your animal shuts down during the fireworks, consider purchasing a thunder shirt, which can be found at our store Whiskers & Wags. They are proven to help make animals feel safe and secure, while keeping anxiety levels down.

8. Do keep matches and lighter fluid out of the animals’ reach.

Certain types of matches contain chlorates, which could potentially damage blood cells and result in difficulty breathing—or even kidney disease in severe cases. Lighter fluid can be irritating to skin, and if ingested can produce gastrointestinal irritation and central nervous system depression. Keep those items on a high-rise table out of their reach, and all will be well!

9. Consider getting calming treats and Adaptil collars

Calming treats and Adaptil/anti-anxiety collars are both sold in our retail store Whiskers & Wags, and they have been helpful to ease stress for our animals here. The collar mimics the dogs’ natural pheromone that helps ease tension, and can help them relax during a fireworks display, as long as they are indoors. Calming treats will help do the same things, and will taste good as well!

10. Brush up on flea/tick treatment.

Ticks and fleas are more abundant than ever because of the mild winter we had. They will find a host environment in dogs and cats, and during a celebration it might go unnoticed. We also sell seresto collars which help battle unwanted visitors for up to eight months. They will help during that barbecue and high heated areas! They can be found at our retail store Whiskers & Wags.

These are just some tips that help our furry friends, and you, prepare for the celebratory holiday! Enjoy, and be safe! Our retail store Whiskers & Wags is open during our adoption hours, provided below.

Adoption Hours:

Monday: CLOSED
Tuesday: CLOSED
Wednesday: Noon-8pm
Thursday: Noon-8pm
Friday: Noon-8pm
Saturday: 10am-6pm
Sunday: 1pm-6pm

Written by Teryn


Jun 9 2017

Expect A High Tick Season in KCMO

It’s summertime, which means family vacations, trips to the pool, and fun times had by all. However, the hot summer days also bring things we don’t enjoy so much: ticks! Here are just some visuals of ticks that have been found in the KC Metro area;

Lone Star Tick:
Lone star tick American Dog Tick:TK5KAK4K6KAQ10WQ30VQJ0NQ10KKTK1Q1KBQC05Q10LKO05QNKKKTKIKCK8KBK9QTKBQAKVQT01QJ0BQTKQKTK4K Brown Dog Tick:male brown dog tick(1) Black-legged Tick:lymetickfemale_86086_7

Because we had such a mild winter, during the spring and summer, ticks become more active. KSHB 41 did a piece on what to look out for, which you can find here.

Ticks are commonly found in wooded areas, such as tree limbs, bushes, branches, and leaves, and the more time you spend outside, the more chance you get of facing off ticks, including your furry friend.

Even if you don’t suspect you or your pet has a tick on them, it is always recommended that you do a full-body check after coming from outside. If you see a tick, using tweezers to remove them is the best and safest way. Check your pet regularly, and fitting in a bath might be a good idea too! Here is a video tutorial on the whole process!

While they are a nuisance, the potential diseases they can transfer to us and our furry friends are not fun. Flu-like symptoms can start if you don’t notice them quick enough, and sometimes people develop Lyme Disease. Lyme Disease is not necessarily prevalent in the KC area, but still something to watch out for!

Don’t let this scare you into staying indoors for the summer! Continue to go on walks, that is great bonding time for you and your pet! Having a dog version of a pool party is always a good time! Here at Wayside Waifs, we also sell Seresto collars that can help ward off those fleas and ticks at our retail store, Whiskers & Wags, purchased on site. Now is a good time to also check with your veterinarian to see what preventative you can get prescribed. From all of us here at Wayside Waifs, have a great summer, and be safe!

happy-dog-running-by-500px

Written by: Teryn J.


Dec 6 2016

Frosty Paws – Keep Your Pet Safe This Winter

sadie_snow-nose

Winter is definitely upon us! Not only is it time for humans to dig out their cold weather clothes, it’s also time to think about keeping our pets safe during these arctic cold days. Here are some tips to keeping your pets safe.

1. Keep your pets inside. Limit your pets outside time for bathroom breaks when temperatures start to tumble. If it’s too cold for you, it’s defintely too cold for your pet. If your pet is normally outside, move them to a sheltered garage or heated dog house, away from the wind.

2. Outdoor cats have been known to find refuge underneath the hoods of cars. When the car is started, the cat could become injured or even killed by moving parts of the engine. If you have an outdoor cat, honk the horn before starting the car to give the cat a chance to escape.

3. Keep your dog on a leash in the winter weather. Pets can lose their scent in the snow and ice and find refuge in unfamiliar places. This is also a good opportunity to check your dog or cats id tag to make sure they have the most current contact information in case your pet becomes lost or stolen. We also recommend mircrochipping your pet. More dogs are lost during the winter than any other time of the year.

4. When getting your pet groomed, don’t have them shaved down to the skin. A longer coat provides more warmth. Bathing your dog? Be sure to completely dry them before taking them out for a walk. For short-haired breeds, put them in a warm sweater with a high collar that gives the pet coverage from the base of their tail to the belly. My toy poodle Lucy loves to wear her jacket and waits for me to put it on her before going outside.

5. Make sure to keep a dry towel near the door when you bring in your dogs from being outside. Thoroughly dry their paws, legs and belly. They can pick up bits of salt, antifreeze and other lethal chemicals from being outside. It can also be painful for the animal to have shards of ice in their fur. A dogs paws can actually bleed from encrusted ice. This is also a good opportunity to give them some extra love and praise them for good outdoor behavior.

6. Never leave your pet alone in a vehicle. The vehicle can act as a refrigerator, keeping the cold inside and causing your pet to freeze to death.

7. If your pet spends a lot of time playing outside, increase his food supply. Make sure to include extra protein to help keep his fur in great shape.

8. Coolant and antifreeze are lethal for cats and dogs. If you have any spills in your garage or driveway make sure to clean them thoroughly. Stay away from product s that use ethylene glycol. If your pet should ingest any of these products, call your veterinarian immediately.

9. Rock salt is also dangerous for pets. “Safe Paw” is pet safe ice melt is available for sale at Wayside Waifs and is safe for pets.

10. Give your pet a warm place to sleep. Make sure beds are located away from doors and drafts. Warm blankets or a large pillow is great.

 

Written by: Trish Stinger, Digital Marketing/Brand Manager
Wayside Waifs


Sep 30 2015

Luna’s Journey to Finding a Forever Home

Scared and hungry, Luna came to Wayside Waifs in need of medical attention.

Scared and hungry, Luna came to Wayside Waifs in need of medical attention.

This is Luna. She came to Wayside Waifs from a well-meaning animal lover that did not have his animals spayed/neutered. After a time he ended up with too many animals to care for and was over the city limit for owned animals. That’s when several cats and kittens were brought to Wayside, including Luna.

She was only 2 1/2 months old, underweight and suffering from Coccidia (a parasite that when not treated, can cause damage to the lining of a cat’s intestines.) We were able to give her life-saving medications to treat the parasites and she also received standard vaccinations. Once she was well, she was spayed and received a microchip.

While at Wayside, she lived in our kitten nursery with her sister Squirt, receiving nutritious food, care and love from our staff and volunteers.

Stay tuned for more about Luna’s story…


Jun 16 2015

Beat the heat! Keep your pet cool this summer.

Spending summer days with your furry friend can be a lot of fun but the weather conditions aren’t always suitable for your pet. The rising temperatures and extreme humidity that the summer brings can be fatal for your animal if you aren’t aware of the dangers they can bring. On a really hot day your pet probably prefers a cool, air conditioned environment, but if you take on the outdoors with them there are a few things to remember.

Keeping your pet hydrated is crucial. Make sure you provide fresh, clean water that your pet can access at any time.  Also, if you’re unable to keep them indoors make sure that they have a shaded area they can go to when they need to get out of the sun.  If they are outdoors in the sun for too long, your pet can become overheated.  If you are transporting them in a vehicle be sure to never leave them in the car while it’s parked. A parked car can quickly become way too hot for your pet, whether the windows are down or not. Leaving an animal unattended in a parked vehicle can be fatal for your pet so make sure you are able to keep them with you when you’ve reached your destination or just leave them at home so they can stay cool.

Another way to keep your pet cool is to trim their fur. If you have a breed that grows long hair, it can be beneficial to get their hair trimmed short in the summer time. This can keep them much cooler on hot, summer days. It also helps to brush your animal’s fur more often than usual.

Be sure to pay attention to the heat of the asphalt. If it is a hot day, chances are the concrete and asphalt have reached temperatures that can potentially burn your pet’s paws.  Don’t let your pet stand or walk where the ground might be too hot for their paws.

Taking your pet swimming is a great idea for the both of you to cool off.  If you decide to let your pet splash around in a pool, lake, or other body of water do not leave them unsupervised! Not all dogs are natural swimmers and may need help. Don’t just assume that they will be able to swim and take care of themselves while in the water.

It is important to know the symptoms of overheating so that you can know when there is a problem and when you need to take action. Some symptoms of overheating are excessive panting or difficulty breathing, an increased heart rate, excessive drooling, or mild weakness. When body temperatures get too high they can also experience seizures, diarrhea, or vomiting. Pay attention to the weather and be aware of the potential danger that the hot summers can bring. By doing this you can beat the heat and have a fun but safe summer with your furry friend!

 


Apr 24 2015

Dog Training Tips: Excessive Chewing

How to help your little chewer 

It’s not uncommon for dogs to enjoy chewing on different objects, regardless of whether or not it’s something they should or shouldn’t be chewing on, all dogs have the natural instinct to chew.  Dogs chew on things for different reasons, some of these include: they’re bored, they’re panicking due to separation anxiety, they’re teething, they’re exploring the world around them, they’re hungry, or they just naturally enjoy chewing as a daily activity.  It’s our responsibility as their owners to try to figure out why they’re chewing and ensure they have appropriate items for them to chew on.  Below is some additional information about how to manage a dog that likes to chew a lot.

  • Puppies go through two teething phases, one when their puppy teeth or “milk teeth” start to come in at about 3 weeks old and the second when their adult teeth start to come in at about 3 months old.  It’s not uncommon for young dogs up to two years of age to continue to want to chew a lot into their teenage phase even though they are no longer teething.
  • Generally speaking, younger dogs have a lot more energy than older dogs so as a result they are much more active and need to be given constructive outlets to burn off all that energy.  If they’re not given the appropriate exercise and mental stimulation for their age and breed, young dogs can become very destructive in your home.  It’s imperative that you make the time to exercise your young dog, train basic obedience behaviors to your young dog so that they learn some manners, and give them appropriate chew bones and toys.  A tired dog is a good dog.
  • Always supervise young dogs to ensure they are not chewing on inappropriate objects and to ensure they are not choking and/or ingesting parts of the toys you’ve given them to play with and chew on.  Baby gates, crates, or keeping your dog on a leash tied to your belt are all good tools for total supervision until you get to know your dog and his or her chewing habits.  Not all dogs can play with the same toys safely so it’s imperative that you monitor your dog when you give them a new toy for the first time.  Ingested toys can cause serious life threatening intestinal blockages and the surgery alone to remove the blockage can cost a few thousand dollars at a veterinary office.
  • You can ensure that your dog is not chewing on inappropriate objects by keeping your personal items picked up and put away.  Also make sure that rooms are safe for your dog and that things like plugged in power cords are out of your dog’s reach.  Closing doors to extra rooms like bedrooms and bathrooms will ensure that your dog is not sneaking off and chewing on your things or harming herself.  Remind your children that it is their responsibility to keep their items like toys and shoes put away if they don’t want them chewed on by the dog.  It’s not uncommon for dogs of any age to want to chew things that smell strongly of their owners like dirty socks, underwear, shoes, etc. so make sure they are out of your dog’s reach.
  • If your dog is chewing on an inappropriate item, always redirect their chewing to their dog toys and bones instead of scolding them.  Scolding them will not diminish their need to chew and do something mentally stimulating; it will just teach your dog to fear you.  Instead teach them what they should be doing by offering them toys or chews that they should chew on.  See the list below of toys recommended for excessive chewers.
  • If your dog is chewing on larger items that you can’t put away like furniture, you may want to try a taste deterrent spray like bitter apple spray.  However, the best option is always going to be supervising your dog when you’re home and then redirecting them to an appropriate toy when they feel the need to chew.  If you’re not home to supervise then you may need to crate train your dog or baby gate them in a dog proof room like a kitchen or bathroom.  Some people can safely give their dogs toys to chew on while they are away while others cannot because their dog may have a history of ingesting or choking on toys.
  • If your dog is excessively chewing when you are not home and is doing things like escaping out of its metal or plastic crate and then chewing up carpets, doors, or the molding around your doors or windows, you most like have a dog that is suffering from separation anxiety and should seek immediate help from your veterinarian and a behaviorist.  Please see our separation anxiety handout.  Your dog is experiencing extreme mental and emotional distress, akin to a panic attack. Do not continue to try to crate your dog; she may severely injure her body or teeth while trying to escape out of a crate.
  • Recommended dog toys for excessive chewers*:
    • Kongs stuffed with peanut butter or wet dog food and then frozen
    • Himalayan Chews
    • Goughnuts
    • Nylabones
    • Wholesome rolled rawhide bones
    • Deer, moose, or elk antlers
    • Bull horns
    • Bully sticks
    • Rope toys
    • Tuffy plush toys
    • Leather toys
    • Red Barn or Merrick marrow bones

*Items above are generally safer if they are made in the USA compared to products shipped in from overseas, particularly animal products such as rawhides and marrow bones.  Wayside Waifs does not receive any financial reimbursement for endorsing these products.  Wayside Waifs can also not be held liable should your dog have problems while interacting with these toys.

 


Powered by WordPress, Created by Spur Communications