Falling for Fall

In less than a month, it will be Fall! Everyone looks forward to cooler weather, pretty scenery, and themed drinks. Our animals can enjoy the season as well, but there are certain things to watch out for. The following are tips on how to prepare for the season, which this year, is September 22 2017-December 21 2017.

1. Watch out for ticks.

Even though ticks are prevalent in the summer, they still are very active in the fall. If you do spot a tick, it is important to be careful when removing it. Any contact with the tick’s blood can potentially transmit infection to your dog or even to you! Treat the area with rubbing alcohol and pluck the parasite with tweezers, and make sure you’ve gotten the entire tick-leaving no parts behind.

2. Beware of rat poison, antifreeze, and other chemicals.

Ingesting antifreeze is lethal. Unfortunately both cats and dogs have been known to lick this up if any spills are is out and within reach. Make sure to check your car for leaks and make sure all bottles are stored far away from your pets. Be careful when it comes to mouse traps and rodenticides like rat and mouse poison. Direct ingestion can be deadly. If your pet does ingest any chemical, seek emergency care immediately. 

3. Watch out for mushrooms.

In some regions of the country, fall is just as wet as spring. That means more mushrooms will pop up in your yard depending on where you are. While most mushrooms are perfectly safe, there’s a small percentage that are highly toxic to our furry friends (and to us!). If you think your pet has ingested a mushroom, contact your vet immediately.

4. Let them grow out their fur coat.

If you have a dog that you shave during the summer, let him or her start growing their coat back in the fall. Just like you need your Fall/Winter coat they’ll needs theirs too. You can continue to groom them, but only for a trim and not a full-on haircut. You wouldn’t want them to get super cold outside!

5. Get your holiday plans in order.

As the holidays approach, most of us will get busier and possibly have to travel. Take time out and plan ahead so you can make the holidays easier on your pets. If you have a pet that has special needs or is wary of new people, be sure to tell your guests about your pet before they come over. Make sure your pets can’t escape through the main entrance of your home. This is especially important if you plan on having several guests in and out of the house this holiday season. It may be worth investing in a baby gate or creating some kind of barrier between the door and your pet. Especially if you have pet that’s known for bolting. If you are leaving out of town and will be boarding your pets, call months in advance as most vets and boarding places get booked up.

6. Be careful with holiday treats and decorations.

Aside from known hazards such as chocolate, cooked bones, raw bread dough, many fruits and vegetables can also be life threatening to pets. Many shiney new decorations look like really fun toys to your pets. Make sure decorations are out of reach because many of them contain toxic metals and can become choking hazards.
7. Keep school supplies out of reach.
Fall is back-to-school time, and those of you with young children know that means stocking up on items like glue sticks, pencils and magic markers. Although these items are considered not lethal to pets, their stomach might develop a blockage if ingested. Be sure your children keep their school supplies out of your pet’s reach.
8. Watch out for wildlife.
Autumn is the season when snakes are preparing for hibernation, increasing the possibility of bites to those unlucky pets who find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time. Pet parents should know what kinds of venomous snakes may be lurking in their environment—and where those snakes are most likely to be found—so pets can be kept out of those areas.
These are just some of the many things you can watch out for during the fall season, but hopefully these helped you! You can always visit our campus during our adoption hours.
  • Monday: CLOSED
  • Tuesday: CLOSED
  • Wednesday: Noon-8pm
  • Thursday: Noon-8pm
  • Friday: Noon-8pm
  • Saturday: 10am-6pm
  • Sunday: 1pm-6pm

Written by Teryn

 


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