Sep 27 2014

10 Things You Missed From the 2014 Strutt With Your Mutt

With approximately 1300 registered participants — dogs and dog owners — in attendance, this year’s 24th annual Strutt With Your Mutt was an absolute success. And it was all thanks to our dedicated supporters! But, in case you were not able to join this amazing event, we have highlighted some of the not-to-be-missed moments from this year’s extravaganza.

10 Must-see Moments:

This year’s Strutt With Your Mutt had lots of colorful characters in attendance. So, what did we see?

Puppies!!!

 puppy

Little Dogs

little dogs

BIG Dogs

big dogs

Screen Shot 2014-09-24 at 12.56.30 PM

Spotted Dogs

big-dogs

Spotted Dogs Dressed As Cows

cow dog

Dogs Dressed as Collie-flowers

collie flowers

Dogs “Being Dogs” (Translation: Sniffing Butts)

dog sniff

Dogs Traveling in Packs of Four

greyhounds

Dogs…That Simply Don’t Travel

Screen Shot 2014-09-24 at 12.38.57 PM

Legacy Dogs!

legacy dogs

Find Your Own Forever Mutt to Strutt

If you are looking for a mutt to call your own, look no further than Wayside Waifs. Below is a complete list of our shelter hours. So, what are you waiting for? Your forever dog is just one visit away.

Shelter Hours:

Wednesday-Friday Noon-8pm

Saturday 10am-6pm

Sunday 1pm-6pm


Sep 10 2014

Give Your Dog a Bone

Lola-PumpkinAs we say goodbye to fresh fruit and lazy pool days, we wind into fall, which ushers in a slew of its own spectacular perks. Amongst them, pumpkin. This fall, help Fido greet cooler weather barking. Your pooch can indulge in savory pumpkin-based dog bones while you enjoy a quick and simple recipe that gets your dog’s tail wagging.

Peanut Butter & Pumpkin Dog Treats: The Recipe

We’d like to give a big thank you to Kelly of All Recipes for sharing this great, mess-free formula.

The Fixings

  • 2 tablespoons peanut butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup canned pumpkin

The How-to

1. After preheating your oven to 350 degrees, it’s time to create your doggy dough.

2. To get the desired pumpkin-peanut butter goodness, whisk together peanut butter, eggs, flour, salt, cinnamon, and — the magical ingredient that no fall would be complete without– pumpkin.

*The desired effect is a moist, playable dough. Add water, as needed, to achieve this.*

3. After flattening this mixture into a dough half-an-inch in height, cut half-inch by half-inch pieces.

*If at this point your hands are covered in gooey, sweet dough, ask your four-legged friend to help with the preliminary finger-licking cleanup.*

4. Once the oven is preheated, bake treats for approximately 40 minutes, or until treats are firm.

The Finishing Touch

The fifth and final step is a taste test from your furry friend. Once cooled, share the taste of fall with your furball, checking for a tail wag of approval. This recipe should be repeated throughout the fall season. However, to maintain a healthy, balanced diet, be sure to take your dog on a walk through the bright-colored autumn leaves.


Aug 18 2014

Penny’s Foster Experience

Hi, we are the Wand’s, Penny’s foster parents. We would like to tell you a little bit about this special girl.

Penny has come along way since we first brought her into our home. She was shuffled around from shelter to shelter throughout her young life, so she had no idea how to behave like a normal, functioning dog. She would constantly nip and jump to get our attention and could not settle down or self soothe. We just couldn’t get through to her so we talked to the vets and decided it would be best to put her on puppy Prozac. Since then she is more calm and takes direction better.

Penny’s Progress

She now sleeps through the night on the bed with us and is mostly housebroken. She plays well with the older, bigger dogs in the house. Every Tuesday she goes to doggy daycare to work on her socialization skills; we also go to the dog park! She does pull on her walks, so we use an easy-walk harness, which helps tremendously. She loves playing in the water, especially when it comes out of the hose. She’s also very interested in swimming, but she definitely needs a life jacket.

Her Care

We free feed Penny a high-protein, grain-free diet dog food. She enjoys treats, chew toys and Nyla bones. Her favorite toys are plush squeaky toys and old socks that I stuff empty water bottles in or tennis balls. Other than that, she loves getting affection from her humans, and being the center of attention is her favorite. Penny also loves to cuddle!  When my husband gets home from work, they have a routine where they cuddle on the bed. It’s so funny because she will follow him in there, jump up on the bed and wait for him patiently.

Although she has made a lot of progress, we are still working with her on not jumping on people and her new favorite thing, counter surfing on the kitchen counter. Penny is an adventerous spitit who loves car rides, but — be warned — will jump out the window if it is down too low. We also, have a hole in our fence that she likes to try to explore. She doesn’t go far, but she likes to visit the bloodhound in the other yard.

Help Penny Find Her Forever Home

Penny will make a great companion for a family that is willing to put in a little time and extra energy, giving her their unconditional love. Thanks for taking the time to read about our special Penny girl. We love her and know you will, too!

Sincerely,

The Wand’s


Aug 18 2014

You Can Never Replace an Old Pet—But You Can Welcome a New Friend

A few years ago we lost Pumpkin, a golden retriever we had gotten as a puppy, to cancer. After we said our final goodbye, and she crossed the rainbow bridge, my husband and I cried so loudly I suspect people could hear us from the waiting room.

For a couple of days, Ginger, our other golden retriever, moped around the house. She stared at her sister’s empty bed. My husband and I decided to get a new dog. After all, we reasoned, it would be good for Ginger. It turned out to be very good for us, too.

We decided that we would prefer to adopt a dog from a shelter. Because Ginger was old and so gentle by nature, we wanted a smaller dog who wouldn’t be too tough for her. We went with Ginger to Wayside Waifs and introduced her to a cute little mix.

Moxie At Wayside Waifs

 

In the year she had been alive, the little pup had been in three different homes and had been taken to the shelter twice. She shied away from us at first, but when I was squatting down, she ran over, licked by nose and darted away. I knew she was our dog. We correctly suspected that her initial timidity hid a fierce little spirit, so we named her Moxie.

When we first brought Moxie into our house on a snowy night, she trembled and refused to take a treat from my hand. Just an hour or two later, she was curled up on my legs, as though she knew she was finally home.

MoxieOnMyLegs

Moxie and Ginger made a funny, sweet pair. Ginger was mellow, with saintly patience, while Moxie was high-strung and filled with energy. They played tug-of-war, although Ginger didn’t have to try very hard. Moxie took to sitting and lounging on top of Ginger, who found no quarrel with the arrangement.

Moxie On Ginger

Over a year after Moxie joined our family, we had to say goodbye to Ginger. It was just as painful as before. This time, we went almost immediately to Wayside Waifs for a new pet.

We were won over by a year-0ld rat terrier we named Clio. She had been picked up on the streets of Wichita as a puppy, and for the past several months, she had been in shelters.

Clio Sitting Up Straight

Clio seemed to be a good match with Moxie. True, at first Moxie defended “her” spots in our laps, and Clio guarded her food, but they soon learned there were plenty of cuddles and kibble to go around. They are funny, curious girls who love their walks and love snuggling. Every day when we come home from work or running errands, we find them sitting side by side at the front window, waiting to greet us.

Moxie and Clio at the window

Every one of our dogs has been different, and we love them for their own quirks and qualities – Moxie’s curious head tilt, for example, or the way Clio jumps about five fee in the air when she gets excited. But what all dogs have in common is their ability to love with all their hearts, once they understand they are loved.

You can never replace an old dog. Years later, memories of them still make you smile and tug at your heart. However, sharing your love and your home with a dog in need of both is always a blessing, and an opportunity to make wonderful new memories.

 

-  Stacey Donovan, Contributing Writer for Wayside Waifs


Aug 8 2014

Canine Atopy

Canine AtopyEveryone has a concept of what allergies are in people, but while pets can suffer from allergies too they look and are usually managed quite differently.  An allergy is an abnormal immune response the body has to something that is harmless. The immune system basically overreacts and mistakenly perceives this harmless thing as being a threat to the body.  Animals can have allergic reactions to vaccinations, bee stings, a particular food, or things in the environment. In the context of this article we are going to just address environmental allergies in dogs, which the proper term for is canine atopic dermatitis or atopy.  Atopy is a fairly common type of allergic condition that is estimated to affect anywhere from 3-15% of the dog population (MacDonald) and can be very challenging to manage.

Common clinical signs of atopy include rubbing, licking, biting or scratching at their feet, muzzle, ears, armpit and belly areas. The skin in these areas may be red and inflamed and some dogs will also develop secondary skin infections due to all the self trauma they’re causing. Many dogs may also have frequent ear infections or anal gland problems.  Dogs may be itchy year round or seasonally.

As with anything, it’s important to rule out other medical conditions first since there are other causes for itchy skin.  If your vet is starting to think your dog may have an allergic condition, one of the first things he or she will do is make sure your dog doesn’t have external parasites like fleas or skin mites.  Your vet may also do bloodwork to rule out common internal diseases that can cause skin issues.  An additional test may be a diet trial to rule out food allergies. This involves feeding a special prescription diet only for 8-12 weeks and monitoring for improvement of symptoms.  If your dog responds favorably then that may mean he or she has a food allergy instead of environmental allergies.

Through out this entire process your vet may prescribe different medications to help alleviate the symptoms and make your dog more comfortable.  The goal of most treatment plans is to manage the symptoms, rather than treat the allergy, similar to people who take allergy medication when they are especially sneezy or sniffly.  Some types of medication that your vet may prescribe include antihistamines, oral steroids, topical steroids, immunosuppressive drugs, medicated baths or wipes and fatty acid supplements.  If there are any signs of a secondary bacterial or yeast skin infection then antibiotics or antifungals may also be prescribed.  As with any medication there can be side effects so ask your vet what side effects you should be monitoring for and notify them if you see any.

If your dog does not respond to the diet trial and is still miserable despite frequent attempts to manage the symptoms with medications your vet may recommend allergy testing and allergy shots by a veterinary dermatologist. This will help provide answers as to what your dog is allergic to so that specific injections can be given on a schedule to help desensitize your dog’s immune system to allergens.  It can often take a long time for dogs to respond and not all of them do.

Now if that all seems complicated and confusing that’s because it usually is!  Most of these dogs are challenging to diagnose and treat.  And because it can often take a long time (weeks to months) to achieve an acceptable degree of relief from the itchiness and discomfort pet parents can get easily discouraged.

While the most important thing is to develop a good relationship with a vet you trust, YOU as a pet parent will be a key component in helping your dog through this.  If your vet suspects your dog may have atopy here are some helpful things you can do:

1. Keep track of what you’re seeing.  Write it down and bring it to your vet appointments so that you can provide your vet the most accurate information.

2. Pay particular attention to:

  • What signs are you seeing and how severe are they?
  • When are you seeing them? All the time during particular months?
  • How long do they last?
  • Is there any improvement with any type of treatment?
  • At what age was your dog when you started noticing clinical signs?

3. Follow your vet’s treatment directions
There may be a greater number of medications with specific treatment instructions.  Following the treatment plan will not only ensure the best chance for your dog to improve but provide good information to your vet.  If you are unable to follow all of your vet’s directions be honest with them.

4. Discuss the goals of treatment with your vet, and understand that in many cases the treatment plan may be to manage the symptoms, rather than treat the underlying cause.

5. Understand that diagnostics and treatment may be financially more than you might expect. Be honest about what you can do and what you can’t do.

6. Be prepared to be a frequent visitor of your vet’s practice!

7. Be prepared that your vet may recommend your dog see a dermatologist.  They are experts in skin conditions and may be able to better help your dog.

Written by Alison Liu. DVM
Wayside Waifs

 

 

Citations:

MacDonald, John M. Western Veterinary Conference. 2012. Las Vegas, NV. n.p. n.d. Web.


Jul 31 2014

The “Right to Farm” Bill: What It Really Means

On August 5, 2014, Missourians will have the opportunity to vote on Amendment 1, also known as the “Right to Farm” bill. Because of this initiative’s misleading namesake, it is important for voters to know what the vague, open-ended language on the ballot really means. With potentially harmful effects on our farmers, farmland, and animals, it is pertinent that you are well educated about this issue before casting your vote in the upcoming election.

What You Need to Know

Deregulation of Puppy Mills & Animal WelfareRight-to-farm-bill

Animal welfare groups like the Humane Society of the United States have largely opposed this bill, as it is believed that it could lift state-mandated safeguards that regulate puppy mills and farm livestock. With Representative Jason Smith from Smith’s Kennels, one of the largest, family-operated dog breeder operations in Missouri, co-sponsoring Amendment 1, the personal agendas of the bill’s supporters are more concerning than ever. As a proponent of animal welfare, Wayside Waifs encourages you to vote no on this initiative to deregulate the puppy mill industry.

Empowerment of Foreign Corporations

Despite the bill’s intention to mislead voters, which appears to cater to the needs and wants of local Missouri farmers, the only parties whose rights this initiative caters to are those of foreign corporations and factory farms.  In fact, if Amendment 1 was added to the state constitution, it could undo previously passed legislation implemented to protect local farmers, farmland, and animals.

To put things in perspective consider the fact that Smithfield Farms, Missouri’s largest pig producer, has already been acquired by a Chinese aggregate. Additionally, a 50,000-acre plot of farmland was recently purchased by a Chinese corporation, wanting to open a factory farm. What makes these developments so concerning? Amendment 1 could disassemble legal checks and balances that are in place to protect the environment. 40 percent of Chinese farmland suffers from degraded quality.  This is directly correlated to pollution resulting from the lax environmental practices of large, profits-first corporations. Missouri land is a precious commodity, and it deserves to be treated as such.

Reduced Food Labeling

Missouri residents have the right to safely manufactured food and knowledge about its contents. However, Amendment 1 could result in the dismantling of efforts that succeeded in the implementation of better food regulation, specifically the labeling of GMOs. In recent years, Missouri farmers have been a large source for food produced from sustainable practices. With the quality of our food on the line, it is crucial that Missouri voters prevent Amendment 1 from being enacted in our state constitution.

Protect Our State

Your vote matters, so make it count. Missouri farmers, farmland, and animals are dependent on it. Before the upcoming election, educate family and friends about the negative effects this bill could have on the Missouri agriculture system, as we know it.

For more information about why you should vote no on Amendment 1, be sure to visit http://votenoon1.com/.


Jul 14 2014

Meet Wayside’s First Canine Behavior Modification Specialist

Gabby Muñoz began her new position at Wayside Waifs in May. Along with overseeing Wayside’s behavior modification and enrichment programs, she also works with the most challenging dogs to make them adoptable. Gabby works with one of our Waifs

Gabby received her Master of Science degree in Biology, with Zoology concentration, from Western Illinois University. Before joining Wayside she served as head of dog training at Dog Pawz Day Care in New Orleans. Most recently, Gabby was a zoo keeper at the Kansas City Zoo. She has two adopted cocker spaniels, Wylie and Brando and has been a volunteer at Wayside since last May.

Gabby has created a new series of dog training classes at Wayside. Check out our website to learn more about these classes and to sign-up for upcoming sessions.

Written by: Trish Stinger
Web Marketing Manager
Wayside Waifs


Jun 15 2014

Taking Care of Older Dogs

older-dogsMost dog owners arrive at a point where it is difficult for their dog to do the simplest tasks, like getting up a set of stairs or going for a spin around the block. As a dog owner, this is heartbreaking. The hard fact of life is that, like people, dogs age and require assistance doing otherwise routine things. Although it can be difficult seeing your best friend go through these changes, there are some things you can do to ease the transition.

How You Can Help

By making some simple changes to the way you care for your dog, you can greatly enhance their day-to-day quality of life.

Concentrate on what food you are giving your dog.

There are several considerations that are important to make when it comes to the diet of an older dog. Spending a little more money on the purchase of quality food is important, as it often helps ensure your furry friend is receiving the nutrients he or she needs. Better quality food does not equate to more food. Just like humans, being overweight takes a toll on your dog’s body frame, especially as they age. On the same token, you want to be certain your dog is not underweight, which brings us to our next point.

Maintain Fido’s Dental Health.

Try to brush your dog’s teeth regularly. This will help prevent some diseases and make sure they don’t lose teeth prematurely. Sometimes dental issues keep dogs from eating, causing them to be underweight. If you notice this happening, check their teeth to see if that’s the cause for weight loss.

Schedule regular veterinarian visits

Checkups once a year are fine for most mature dogs; however, it is your responsibility to take your dog to the vet if you notice any unusual or concerning changes. The goal? Prevention, not recovery. Listen to your instincts. If something seems wrong, it probably is.

Keep your dog active and engaged.

Exercise is crucial to the well-being of your aging dog. Just remember, though. Mental health is of equal importance.  Having toys around for your dog to play with will keep them engaged. Car rides and walks offer a great change of scenery, too. And with sensory stimulation playing a key role in your dog’s happiness, it must not be overlooked in everyday interactions.

Treat Your Dog How You Would Want to be Treated.

The simplest way to ensure your aging dog’s happiness? Treat your dog how you would want to be treated in your old age. It’s as simple as that. As man’s best friend, Fido deserves some extra T.L.C.

 

 

 


May 21 2014

Meet Raider

A Foster Story From Julie Poland

raiderr

In a home environment, he has been extremely well behaved.  He follows me around the house and gets up immediately, even if sleeping, just to see where I am going.  He’s been very sweet and gentle with my two kids and husband.

He never liked going back to his kennel at the shelter, and he initially did not like to go into his crate at home either. However, within a few days, he was running up the stairs with my other dogs at bedtime and happily going into his crate to wait for his treats. He sleeps all night in his crate and even lets us sleep in late on the weekends!

He was great with other dogs at the shelter and was in many playgroups with other canines, too.  His play was so appropriate that he was used as a test dog when new dogs arrived at Wayside Waifs to see if they were friendly with other dogs. He’s also been fantastic at my home with my two small dogs.  They are not playful and Raider will occasionally try to engage them in play, but he respectfully stops when they don’t respond to him.

We even had a litter of four foster puppies when we first brought Raider home, and he was so gentle when the puppies tried to play with him.

Raider is crate-trained and house-trained and is great about going outside to go potty.  He walks very well on a leash and only pulls when he sees squirrels and other dogs on leashes.  Raider is only two years old, so he does get into mischief like the young dog that he is. He is still learning what is appropriate to chew and what isn’t.  However, with supervision, he’s learning quickly and is great about dropping something he’s found in exchange for a treat.

My family is enjoying spending time with Raider and will be sad to see him go.  We think he would be happiest in a home with a fenced yard and another playful dog. He was adopted recently for about a week, and the family loved him and had wonderful things to say about him. Unfortunately, one of their dogs did not like Raider.  If the family tried to give attention to Raider the other dog would attack him.  They felt it would be best for Raider to go to a home with another dog who would accept him.  We hope his forever family finds him soon, so he can live the wonderful life he so deserves!


May 19 2014

Footprints on My Heart

adoptionAn Adoption Story: By Megan Pickard

I have always been an animal lover.  I believe animals teach us unconditional love, more so than any other life lesson. When the time came for me to find a volunteer position, there was no question it would be in the animal field. My family and I had adopted our dog from Wayside Waifs seven years ago, so my mother and I applied to become dog walkers. We took dogs from their kennels outside during the day, so they had a chance to run and socialize with humans beyond a glass door. But I wanted to do more to help animals in my community. So I applied to become a foster mom.

Foster moms bring animals out of the shelter when they need some extra TLC. Some animals are very sick, and some come from abusive homes, so they need to re-learn how to love. Others just don’t do well in the noisy environment of a shelter. I instantly fall in love with every animal that comes home with me, treating them like my own furry babies.

It isn’t easy to care for a sick or scared animal; but each day I care for them, I feel my confidence grow and my sense of purpose renew.

One of my favorite memories as a foster mom is taking my first litter of six lab puppies back to the shelter and meeting each family that came to adopt one. There is so much satisfaction knowing that you helped a family find their forever pet. However, not all experiences are pleasant. Last year, one of my foster kittens died in my care. Her body was taken back to Wayside Waifs, where an autopsy discovered an enlarged heart caused by a genetic disorder. I knew nothing I could have done would have prevented this and nothing I did could have caused it, but I still felt very sad. I took comfort knowing that I had given her the best last days any kitten could have had.

From this sadness, happiness was restored again. Since then, I have taken in seven puppies, many more extremely rambunctious kittens, and cats (one crazy pair climbed the Christmas tree and destroyed several ornaments – that’s when I knew they were well enough to go back to find their forever family).  I currently have an excitable 4-month-old puppy that was rescued from a dog-fighting ring.

What has my volunteer work taught me? My future plans include being a nurse, and I believe the special affection animals show us is teaching me how to be a compassionate nurse. I have taken in several dogs, rescued from abusive situations, which now bathe my face with kisses whenever I return home. The previously mentioned rambunctious cats came to my house extremely malnourished and ill and left with restored health. More than anything, these animals have taught me to love unconditionally, no matter what your past is, reminding me that each day is a gift that should be enjoyed to the fullest –especially if that day brings you Christmas trees to climb and ornaments to destroy!


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